“Act only on that maxim through which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law.” (Kant 88)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsgAsw4XGvU
This sentence resumes in great part the essence of  Kantian Philosophy. It collects in only 21 words the whole moral theory of one of the most complex philosophers. It is translated to a  complicated english. The targeted audiences are  topic specific readers, in its lowest levels college students. Thats why there is no necessity to sugar code it with an easier translation.  Talking about universality is always a complicated topic because there are many grey areas in the world. But the way the phrase is stated makes it clear that universality is crucial in this area. In one hand you have doing actions that everyone can do, on the other hand you have actions that if everyone committed the world will be chaos. The concept is either black or white.

 

Alejandro Rengifo

Professor Hoskins

WRTG 101

January 31, 2017

 

Preface City of Rhetoric

In the preface of City of Rhetoric, David Fleming argues that the social economic division that exists in our modern age is due to the poor political relations between people. His evidences are external realities gained by studies of the environments he uses as examples. Apart from that, he connects three different categories of thinking, political philosophy, urban design and rhetorical thinking. He narrates how in certain time periods there is a connection between this three different types of thinkings. He uses as an example United States post civil war until 1915 to prove the correlation between this three categories of thinking. Also, during this time period the American civic space was transitioning into a metropolitan area. This guided into the connection of many different cultures and ideologies.  Fleming insists in how different cultures should be connected, not separated by civic space and the necessity to continue doing it.

Alejandro Rengifo

Professor Hoskins

WRTG 101

January 31, 2017


In the first chapter of City of Rhetoric, David Fleming aims to show an example that reflects what he will later explain in his book. The example he uses is the development of certain parts of the city of Chicago. How during time they started to change depending on the people who lived there. He also discusses the organization of it and how the chapters intertwine. The focus of Fleming’s is the importance of rhetoric in the construction of society. How creating commonplaces for citizens to discuss is key for developing a sense of community. There are great benefits when talking to one another. Fleming also argues about the importance of having different cultures to conform a place to live. He uses political philosophy and statistics from different time periods as a way to prove his claims about living in community. At the end he calls for the use of rhetoric to solve problems. After reading this first chapter is clear why the book is called City of Rhetoric.

Alejandro Rengifo

Professor Hoskins

WRTG 101

February 7, 2017

 

Single Benches and Architectural Regulation

It has become common today to dismiss the idea of how architecture is used as a regulation. In her recent work, Sarah Schindler, a professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law offers harsh critique on how modern architecture creates barriers. Not many people think about  physical environment serving as a way of social exclusion. Only few question why cities are developed the way they are.

To put it succinctly, urban planning is widely used to locate certain demographic groups into determined locations. Schindler deplores the tendency to exclude certain people from  locations using architectural tricks. Consider how sometimes benches are designed with three individual seats instead of the traditional way. This design is not only for vanity it also serves the purpose of preventing homeless of sleeping in them (Schindler 1942). Moreover, architecture can also regulate human behavior. Lessig an author quoted by Schindler, demonstrates how certain architectural pieces can prevent human beings from interacting with each other, such as highways (Schindler 1947).  The essence of the argument is how in minor and macro scales social interactions can be limited, with the knowledgeable application of architecture. Architecture is a powerful tool that has been used to regulate society. It continues to regulate it even more and prevents people from developing truthful social communication.

The upshot of all of this is that as a globalized society we need to push for social integration. We can’t limit ourselves to be spectators in how urban planners limit our interaction. Is a growing necessity for people to interact with each other no matter the  differences in backgrounds. Race or socioeconomic status should not be determinants on who merges with who. People need to fight for architectural development that benefits the totality of the social spectrum.

 

Works Cited

Graff, Gerald, et al. “They Say/I Say”: The Moves That Matter in Academic     Writing: With Readings. 2nd ed, W.W. Norton & Co, 2012.

Sarah Schindler. “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment.” The Yale Law Review, 2015, pp. 1937–2023.

 

“Occasionally you meet someone with a thousand-year heart.” (Brooks 174) The Road to Character

This sentence impacted me dearly, after reading it I could not stop reading it again and again. It’s true how rare is to meet someone that has a pure heart and worth having high esteem too. Having this sentence at the beginning of one of the most important paragraphs of the chapter sets perfectly the tone of what the
author is trying to describe later on. It is a relatively short sentence but full of meaning. The way the words are formulated permits the reader to focus on t
he rarity of the event. Using the world occasionally and the hyperbole “thousand-year heart” to mention how peculiar is to find this kind of person marks the importance of the event. Is amazing how well the message is delivered. The use of figurative language is crucial for effective rhetoric the same happens with short and powerful sentences.

 

 

Politics is about: “who gets what, when and how.” Harold Lasswell

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjapkY9ODPQ

This phrase is written by the famous political scientist Harold Lasswell. It has great syntax depth. It’s depth derives from the way he arranges three of the five Ws. This strategy permits him to effectively deliver a complex idea into a catchy phrase. Using three common words to define such a complex concept as Politics makes his idea approachable to everyone who reads it.