Tag Archives: built environment

A Simple and Revolutionary Design: The WeWork Website

As I entered the WeWork Wonder Bread Factory building, inspiration overtook me. I was surrounded by modern-graphic art, and young workers ready to take on the world. When I entered the WeWork Wonder Bread Factory website, I felt the same feeling as when I walked into the building itself. By simply being in the building, or on the website, I feel like I am apart of something revolutionary. This corporation does an excellent job of connecting all aspects of their company together. Instead of having separate or varying buildings and websites, they all complement each other to establish one brand. More specifically, the WeWork website’s user-friendly and modern design work together to attract the younger buyers that the company desires.

The beautiful interior of the building. This shows how modern the building is and how different is is from the past.
The beautiful interior of the building. This shows how modern the building is and how different is is from the past.

The WeWork site is filled with appealing graphics and an easy structure that will impress potential buyers. The site opens with beautiful pictures of the interior building; there are six different images of varying locations. Not only do the images accurately capture the sophisticated interior of the location, but they also impress visitors and potential buyers. WeWork provides office spaces for any person or company to buy. However, beyond that they also have various amenities such as common areas, phone booths, onsite staff, coffee, printing, fruit water, and more (WeWork). This is not your typical business. WeWork‘s goal is to provide people with their dream work space and based on their multiple locations across the country, they are succeeding (WeWork). Individuals who are looking to purchase office space would immediately lose interest in a website and location that did not have accurate or appealing pictures of the site.

This is the top of the website, the picture of the staircase will continuously switch out with other pictures of the interior. On the left is also a form that will follow users as they scroll down the page.
This is the top of the website, the picture of the staircase will continuously switch out with other pictures of the interior. On the left is also a form that will follow users as they scroll down the page.

Next to the images there is a form to schedule a tour, and this form continues to stay on the left side of the page as you scroll down. Website users do not need to go back up to the top of the page to schedule anything. This function makes it very easy for people to schedule a visit. There are also no additional links needed to access different portions of this website; people do not need to leave the original page for any more information. Users only need to simply scroll down to get the office space prices and different building amenities. This function also matches the company’s physical location. Inside the building, it is easy to access everything. There is no confusion on where items are and WeWork knows this is appealing for their clientele. When people visit websites, they do not want to be bothered with complex designs nor do they want to get lost searching for information on the page. This website does not have these problems, which will immediately impress buyers because they do not have to go searching for the material and resources they need. Additionally, they may also make the connection that the website reflects the business itself, and will be more willing to purchase or visit the space.

A screenshot of the various amenities the building has, again, on the left is the form to schedule a visit
A screenshot of the various amenities the building has, again, on the left is the form to schedule a visit

An easily functionable and appealing website combine to contribute to attracting the young, up-and-coming entrepreneurs that WeWork strives for. This website’s main purpose is for their office spaces to be purchased by those who share WeWork’s vision. Their site states, “We are creators, leaders, and self-starters. We try new things, we challenge convention, and we’re not afraid to fail” (WeWork). This statement is inspiring, especially for young individuals who are eager to begin their own business or career. Therefore, in order to hook these people, they must have a website that captures everything their business and office spaces represent. A younger audience will be more impressed with WeWork’s easy and appealing site. Since this younger generation has grown up with technology, they have higher expectations for websites and corporations. Additionally, now in the digital-age, buyers are looking for better graphic designs, and for websites to be as easy to use as possible. Old-fashioned and complicated sites are becoming extinct, and WeWork capitalizes on this fact.

The website's mission statement, which also reflects the overall WeWork brand they have established for themselves
The website’s mission statement, which also reflects the overall WeWork brand they have established for themselves

The WeWork Wonder Bread Factory building website goes above-and-beyond to attract potential customers, and based on my observations of their workforce, they are succeeding in luring in entrepreneurs who strive to change the world.

The Beauty and Necessity in Change: Wonder Bread Factory, S Street

From the second I walked into the Wonder Bread Factory, I was struck by its beauty. I expected to see old brick, and historic structures from the building’s older Dorsch’s White Cross Bakery days from 1913, but instead, I was surrounded by sophisticated graphic art designs, and complex objects. There is no question that the Wonder Bread Factory on 641 S St. NW is not the same building it was decades earlier. There are no longer flour-covered workers tossing dough and bread from one section of the kitchen to the other. They have been replaced with millennials in business suits conversing over coffee on beautiful wooden tables. The interior may have drastically changed, but I have the feeling that people are still accomplishing something special.

img_4433
The exterior of WeWork and the old Wonder Bread Factory.

When WeWork, a company dedicated to providing office spaces, came to DC, they were motivated to find a location that would improve the “creative space” that was lacking in the city (O’Connell). The thirty-three thousand square foot building with “high ceilings, large glass windows, exposed brick and wood beams” was the exact space they were searching for (O’Connell). The building requires a keycard to enter, but guests can ring the doorbell for entrance. Once inside, there is a waiting area with decorative, seasonal pillows on two couches and a wooden table. There is also graphic art design on this portion of the walls, which is an interesting touch to include with the older brick. 

img_4723
The seating area with various pillows and couches. Notice the older brick wall, graphic art, and beautiful natural light from the streets.

Additionally, the architects certainly made use of the building’s space. Despite the extensive design, there is a giant lobby, and plenty of area to navigate between spaces. Behind the waiting area, there is WeWork’s own reading and book selection. Also, there are two secluded conference rooms and a kitchen for workers. The first conference room is seen immediately when entering, has a sign called, “The Green House,” and in it there are also various plants. In between the two conference rooms, there is a model RV, that holds additional couch seating for guests. 

img_4730
The books, tables, and TV for staff to work with.
img_4725
The “Green Room” or first conference room seen when entering the building.
img_4727
More of the conference room, as well as the Model RV and additional seating for guests
img_4731
The end of the lobby, more tables, and beautiful art.

At the end of the spacious lobby, there are two beautiful, vibrant paintings that depict runners sprinting to the finish line. There is a long table in front of them as well. The entire interior is extremely colorful, but mostly contains navy blues and various shades of greens. A majority of the objects are wooden, and the space itself makes use of the building’s natural light. Despite how modern it looks, the building also kept the brick and high ceiling structures which complements the twenty-first century design.

img_4728
Here is the receptionist’s desk, as well as the large lobby and walking space, there is plenty of room to walk around from area to area. This is also an excellent picture of the building’s ceiling structure.

The interior of the site felt revolutionary, and brought up feelings concerning change due to the atmosphere and mood of the décor. Previously, I talked to Keith, an older man who has lived across the street from the Wonder Bread Factory for several years. He described how customers and workers would toss various bread products to each other inside the factory. They would laugh and have a fun time together, while occasionally getting free bread out of it. As I was wandering around the current building, I pictured the sounds and images of these men working together. Now, individuals are tossing around various concepts for potential companies in the Wonder Bread Factory building. When I observed the area and the workers, I felt positive and hopeful energy. They loved what they were accomplishing, and most importantly, they were happy in their careers. Although I was disappointed at how different the location was from Keith described to me, I could not help but be amazed at how effortlessly things have changed. While it is important to cherish and remember the past, it is necessary to move on, and adapt to the changes in society surrounding us.

Picture of the beginning of the construction process
Picture of the beginning of the construction process