RA6: Afterword

RA6
Within “Afterword” in his City of Rhetoric, David Fleming proposes a new ideal of thought towards “place and community”. Fleming wraps up his argument by showing the “purpose” of his writing and his overall stance on the neglect of domestic public life. Fleming shares that the, “ neglect of domestic public life under this administration has been doubly unfortunate” (Fleming.) He proves his argument by providing two key points, first, urban poverty and homelessness in this country have actually worsened while the attention has moved elsewhere; mainly on middle class residents/households. Second, the exorbitant cost of our new international adventures has made fixing those problems even more difficult than before since, “more and more of an increasingly tight budget must now now be devoted to military spending, foreign aid, and the national defense” (Fleming.)
In his second portion of the “Afterword”, Fleming shares his main point in writing the City Of Rhetoric. Fleming states, “ my point in this book has not been that we should not think globally, that we should not be always intensely aware of the rest of the world and our place in it, both as individuals and as communities.” Fleming proves this argument by providing argumentative research and examples throughout the book. As Fleming has shared, he believes that we should be considering more carefully our metropolitan lives together and thinking more creatively about our civic responsibilities to one another. He furthers this by stating that is it not about simply shifting our political allegiance from one public to another, from the “globe or nation-state to the city or urban district” (Fleming.)

Works Cited
Fleming, David. “Afterword.” City of Rhetoric. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 212-219. Print.

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