Posts Tagged: brandon

Is Social Media the New Source of Rhetoric?

Within the world of social media, the audience pulls the strings. However, does this mean that we the audience are the form of persuasion? Are we the root of online/social rhetoric. The answer is a simple yes, we are the source of all our rhetoric on social media. However with such rhetoric, there is a tendency that the audience may not use such rhetoric correctly, therefore not entirely reach the audience. This is a massive topic with hundreds of documented techniques, concepts, and descriptors. Yet even the basics of Aristotelian rhetoric can help marketers assess and deconstruct their successes and failures in social media communication. The idea of rhetoric within social media deems true as you can see prime examples of celebrities “promoting” products or endorsing brands; to persuade the audience a certain way. However, this can be an issue because not all people can use this rhetoric properly and end up losing their audience. The ongoing influx of rhetoric within our social media is quite interesting to study and figure out.

Commonplace 15

 

The District of Columbia’s Architectural Style

The District of Columbia has been known for its key architectural style, orderly and symmetrical, Washington, D.C.’s early Roman influences have distinguished it from every metropolitan city in the nation. Tall columns, symmetrical shapes, triangular pediments, domed roofs — Neoclassical features can be found anywhere and everywhere in the District. Just the city plan demonstrates Washington, D.C.’s architectural style with its consolidated scheme and central forum with city services. To see just how far the Neoclassical style reaches, check out the map below of 15 examples of Neoclassical architecture found in the District, from memorials to museums to bridges. These examples can be seen through the White House, the Capitol Building, and the National Art Gallery. D.C. architecture is shown throughout the city through persuasive analysis.

Commonplace 14

Rhetoric Within the “Real World”

Within our society, we see rhetoric and persuasion all around us. Our society is full of persuasive information to relate ourselves with a product or particular material. The concepts of rhetoric tend to be applied through the uses of ethos, logos, and pathos to contend to a wide audience population. This tends to be targeted at various focus groups and audiences to bring about a sense of “brand loyalty”. The use of persuasion tends to be within advertisements focusing on clothing, food, or skincare/makeup. Within the studies of rhetoric within literature, you learn that the use of this writing is meant to persuade the writer to believe the writers argument. This can be true within marketing and advertising. Such political advertising in D.C. bring about a sense of nationalism, morale to the city.

Commonplace 13

When thinking of what to talk about for this weeks commonplace, I was quite confused. Ive had so much going on, that I truly didn’t ever sit down and just think of information I learned throughout the week. Then I remembered, I remember a quote that rang clear in my head. I have been reading a lot as I have been healing and a particular quote has been stuck in my head, “You are built of natural disasters, remember how beautiful.” Breaking it down one can see the beautiful allusion it gives. We learn so much information throughout our lives, we learn, we grow, we persuade that information. Breaking down human thought brings about a new sense of vision. We are made of everything and nothing, and when you break down human thought and persuasion, the discussion becomes quite fuzzy.

Annotated Bibliography 9&10

Brandon Morales
Professor Hoskins
Annotated Bibliography
20 April 2017

Works Cited

“Autograph Collection Hotels Adds the Mayflower Hotel to its Portfolio of Independent Hotels.” Manufacturing Close – Up, 2015, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1680035741?accountid=8285.

Within Manufacturing Close-Up, the editorial shares how Mayflower Hotel now joins Autograph Collection Hotels, a group of strikingly independent hotels that are each ‘exactly like nothing else’. Autograph Collection Hotels, Marriott International’s portfolio of independent, one-of-a-kind hotels, is welcoming the newly renovated Washington, D.C., landmark, The Mayflower Hotel. The addition of the Mayflower Hotel brings the Collection to 86 hotels worldwide. The Mayflower Hotel, listed in the National Register of Historic places, opened in 1925 and has since hosted D.C.’s power scene and iconic figures, filling the hotel with a quintessentially capital spirit – and with a signature appeal as iconic as the hotel itself. It is one of the District of Columbia’s most revered hotels, a place filled with old-world elegance and steeped in the history of America’s capital. This was quite an interesting pick up by the Autograph Collection as they are trying to turn the Mayflower Hotel into a more modern enterprise. Additionally, in conjunction with the hotel’s rebranding as part of Autograph Collection, the Mayflower Hotel completed a full renovation, reaching at about $20 million. Each room of the hotel was redone to bring about a new sense of luxury. Julius Robinson, Vice President of Autograph Collection Hotels explains, “ Moving into the 21st Century also means that The Mayflower now offers increased bandwidth for enhanced high-speed Internet access, as well as “smart thermostats” run with a chip embedded in the guest’s key card, which communicates with the air-conditioning unit when the room is occupied in order to adjust temperatures accordingly.” This is meant to bring the olden Mayflower Hotel into the 21st century, and allow the hotel to be adaptable to a more “modern” audience.
This source will be quite interesting to use as it shows how Autograph Collection Hotels saw a market with the Mayflower Hotel. By renovating and “rebranding” the hotel’s look, this will allow for a discussion on the hotels relationship with modern times; and how the hotel relates back to its new audience. I plan on using this source to withstand an argument that the Mayflower Hotel will always hold a grandeur to it; the hotel shall remain a Washingtonian entity while adapting to the new generation.

Ylan Q Mui – Washington Post,Staff Writer. “A Hotel Boosted by a Bedtime Story.” The Washington Post, Apr 03, 2008, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/410195419?accountid=8285.

Within the Washington Post, Ylan Q Mui speaks on how the Mayflower Hotel promotes its notable past to all that enter the prestigious hotel. In her work, Mui shares that, “ The concierge gives them free postcards, and there are plaques throughout the hotel commemorating notable moments in Mayflower history — like the time Winston Churchill told a bawdy joke in one of the domed ballrooms that carried across to the women at the other end.” This shows how the hotel continuously commemorates its past events, and notable guests. Additionally, Mui points on the fact that the hotel uses their past as quite the marketing campaign. By sharing notable guests and events that have been within the hotel, this could possibly persuade those of grandeur to stay within the hotel. The Mayflower boasts cachet that few other hotels can match. It has long been a stop on the tour bus circuit, but Cardone said he has noticed more people hopping off to nose around. The concierge gives them free postcards, and there are plaques throughout the hotel commemorating notable moments in Mayflower history — “like the time Winston Churchill told a bawdy joke in one of the domed ballrooms that carried across to the women at the other end.” The hotel seems to be providing past information for a reason, it attracts visitors.
I plan on using this source to provide a more economical view within the Mayflower Hotel. This will help me correspond the information as to why the Autograph Collection Hotels saw a market within this hotel. The information provided gives key examples to the hotels marketing strategies and how the hotel continuously attracts guests.

Exterior and Political

Front of the Hotel

 The political influence within and from the Mayflower Hotel has been quite monumental. The hotel itself is only blocks away from the White House and the Capitol Building. This puts the site at the heart of political influence. Many renowned political and governmental figures have stayed within this hotel, and many have performed many political acts/speeches within. One such example would be how Harry S. Truman stayed within the Mayflower Hotel during his first 90 days of presidency. Additionally, as I’ve spoken about before, the hotel holds many political campaigns and strives to motivate their voters to actually vote within elections. During this previous election, the hotel took the initiative to have their guests make a pledge to vote for their candidates. The hotel held many inaugural events and has hosted many international government officials; such as Queen Elizabeth and Winston Churchill. The hotel is a hotbed for political talk as it is in the hub of such a politically charged city.

The political influence of the Mayflower Hotel is quite strong actually.An example of the hotels surrounding political influence would be how the Mayflower Hotel hosted the Inaugural Ball of President Calvin Coolidge just two weeks after its opening. It hosted an Inaugural Ball every four years until it hosted its final ball in January 1981. It has not hosted an Inaugural Ball since. President-elect Herbert Hoover established his presidential planning team offices in the hotel in January 1928, and his Vice President, Charles Curtis, lived there in one of the hotel’s residential guest rooms during his four years in office. By being surrounded by such political figures, the hotel itself seems to be quite politically influenced.

On the basis of the exterior, the hotel itself has quite the historic feel to it. The hotels’ main entrance features grand gold detailing and large flags for the District of Columbia and also the hotels’ flags. The exterior hasn’t really been touched up so the comparison between the exterior and interior is quite stark. This is fitting though, as the outside is quite historic and shows the history of the hotel, while the interior plays to a new sense of modernism.

Rhetoric Around Us

Within literature, the terms of rhetoric seem to be displayed all throughout us. During last class, we discussed the the ideals shared by EdBauer when she spoke on the triangulated ideals of the sender, receiver, and text. EdBauer continues this discussion by sharing the ideals of Warner when he states, “ public seems to be self-organized by discourse, but in fact requires pre existing forms and channels of circulation” (75). This whole idea is based on the ideals of rhetoric and rhetorical situations, that we live in a society filled with senders and receivers who are formed by pre existing notions. This is something one can see around them wherever they go, this is something that proves contextual evidence in the sense that rhetoric is all around us.

Works Cited
EdBauer, Jenny. “Unframing Models of Public Distribution: From Rhetorical Situation to Rhetorical Ecologies.” Taylor and Francis. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 1-3. Print.

Wes Anderson’s Persuasion

When watching the Grand Budapest I realized many of the cinematic approaches within the film regarding rhetoric. Whilst learning how rhetoric seems to be a sense of persuasion to the audience, it is prevalent how the film industry will use pathos to persuade the audience/viewer a certain way throughout the film. This can directly paired to the rhetoric that we see in literature, as we use these techniques to persuade the audience a certain way, emotionally and mentally.

Digital Archive Interior and Cultural

 

Main Lobby

The interior of the Mayflower Hotel hold much cultural influence. The recently renovated lobby of the hotel still holds true to the Beaux-Arts architecture, meaning it is a style of heavily ornamented classicism. This style strongly considers the function of the space. This holds true to the vast lobby, which it adorned with gold detailing and extravagant chandeliers. However, the new renovation of the hotel brings about elements of modernism, to add a mix of classicism with a modern touch. The ceiling window has recently been brought back to the hotel so the whole ceiling is glass. This brings a new dimension to the hotel as you can see the sky whenever in the lobby. Additionally, the two hallways leading from the lobby also bring about that sense of “space” as they are vast and wide. Either hallway will lead you to another area of the first floor of the hotel which seems to follow the same architectural style of the lobby.

Hallway from Main Lobby

The cultural influence within in the hotel holds true throughout the architectural style. Even as the hotel has been recently renovated, the hotel still holds the same classicism that brought many notable guests to these grounds. The overall “style” holds a cultural influence towards the hotel as it still holds this sense of grandeur and luxury. Additionally, the hotel still has many of the same artifacts from the original Mayflower Hotel. The chandeliers, gold adorned ceilings, and mirrored walls were all part of the hotel during its early years. The interior of the Mayflower Hotel shows much of its “culture”, that this hotel is an old-fashioned American luxury. When guests visit this hotel, they can feel that authenticity; that overall feeling of a hotel with true grandeur.

Home

Within chapter seven of his book, City of Rhetoric, David Fleming reveals the disconnect that had arisen between those living in the Cabrini Green homes and those who are financially stable enough to live otherwise. This chapter expressed the difference in representation between the two groups; which I found quite interesting. Fleming delivers this interesting discovery by showing how the residents are seen as “outsiders or outcasts” and the Cabrini Green homes as a “low income neighborhood.” Alternatively, Fleming shares how the Cabrini Green homes are seen by the residents.

Firstly, from an outside perspective the Cabrini Green homes were seen as low income, failing, and overall poor neighborhood. Fleming shares that outsiders believe that they are viewed as, “incapable of building and sustaining their own communities” (149). Additionally, Fleming states that outsiders believe they are incapable of providing for their families, living in such a low income economy. However, their also seems to be a sense of racial division within the context of this reading. The outsiders imply that these low income (blacks) need the help of the upper and middle classes (whites). This can also show why the outsiders may feel this way towards the residents of Cabrini Green homes, as a means of racial profiling. Additionally, the outsiders were angered by the news of these homes being built, stating they are “hellish high-rises” in both the Chicago Tribune and the Architectural Record. (152). Many people, including Verdell Wade, were pleased to hear the news of these high-rises being taken down; they even found the news to be “quite pleasant.” (157).

However, there was much support to keep the Cabrini Green housing among the residents of the housing complex. Many of them feared for their future and their children’s future if the high-rises were to be demolished. Many of the residents were upset when they heard of the plans, stating that, “we deserve to own our apartments…. It’s not a project for me, it’s home.” (173). This and various other responses were resident’s annoyance with how they had no true ownership over their own homes. Fleming also shares how the residents want a voice within the policies and programs that go into practice for their housing. When it comes down to it, the residents state how, “we want to be seen as human beings, nothing different.” This quotation shows how the residents see living in the Cabrini Green homes as a way of life; it is their home. (159).

The seventh chapter of Fleming’s, City of Rhetoric, showcases the ideals of home, and the varying aspects of community. It shows how one can feel so varied about a place while another calls it home. This ideal relates back to the whole concept of rhetoric, how some are persuasively inclined to an area while others are not.

Works Cited
Fleming, David. “Home.” City of Rhetoric. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N. pag. Print.