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Developing Creative Assignments

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2016 Ann Ferren Conference Session #306:

This quick paced workshop is designed for experienced Blackboard users who want to learn about the more advanced features within Blackboard. The session explores the grade center in depth, as well as creating and grading with rubrics, how to check for plagiarism using Safe Assign and using adaptive release.

Scott Vanek (Library)
Anton Shimkevitch (Library)

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Closing the Loop: From Assessment to Teaching

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2016 Ann Ferren Conference Session #206:

Faculty learn much about students from their classroom experiences and evaluations of them. “I can’t believe they missed that!” can alternate with “Wow, that was effective—look at how well they did!” Faculty also learn where students are underperforming, and where they mastered a skill or lesson. With help from the Committee on Learning Assessment, participants learn how the knowledge you gain from your student assessments can be shared with colleagues, and brainstorm how to double-purpose that learning to strengthen a program. Targeted at faculty determined to get the most out of their evaluations, this workshop aims to help them understand how to incorporate student responses into future lesson-plans and curricula.

David Banks (SIS)
Patricia Aufderheide (SOC)
Kimberly Cowell-Meyers(SPA-GOVT)
Karen Froslid Jones (Institutional Research and Assessment)

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Assessing and Responding to Academic Misconduct: Evaluating Student Use of Sources

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2016 Ann Ferren Conference Session #204:

This session explores topics and solutions related to plagiarism. The presenters are particularly interested in the intersection of information literacy and academic misconduct. For example, what should a professor do when a source cited in a student paper does not support the position for which it has been offered? This can range from a simple case of a student misunderstanding a complex or nuanced source, to a student intentionally misrepresenting a source in order to bolster his or her argument. On one end is poor subject matter knowledge and information literacy, and at the other end is deliberate academic misconduct. The area between the two leaves much to be explored. This session is intended for teachers with research paper requirements and those interested in ways to improve the quality of student writing and research.

Derek Tokaz (CAS-LIT)
Lydia Fettig (CAS-LIT)