COOKING OPTIONS IN REFUGEE SETTINGS

AUTHOR: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

LAST UPDATED: December 2002

TYPE OF TOOL: Handbook

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees(UNHCR), handbook, fuel and energy

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 47 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49c3646c2.html (UNHCR)

http://www.unhcr.org/406c368f2.html  (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This Handbook provides a summary of practical ideas for the domestic energy sector in refugee situations – a sector that probably has a greater impact on the environment than any other. It covers both proven and experimental ways in which to balance demand for energy with available supply. Acknowledging that cooking is generally the area to which refugees commit the greatest proportion of their domestic energy resources, the Handbook focuses primarily on fuels, stoves and practices that relate directly to cooking.”

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees was established on December 14, 1950 by the United Nations General Assembly. The agency is mandated to lead and co-ordinate international action to protect refugees and resolve refugee problems worldwide. Its primary purpose is to safeguard the rights and well-being of refugees. It strives to ensure that everyone can exercise the right to seek asylum and find safe refuge in another State, with the option to return home voluntarily, integrate locally or to resettle in a third country. It also has a mandate to help stateless people.”

INTENDED USER: “The Handbook is designed for programme and technical staff of UNHCR and its implementing partners, both in the field and at headquarters.”

UNHCR ENVIRONMENTAL GUIDELINES

AUTHOR: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

LAST UPDATED: August 2005

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), water, fuel and energy, land and land use, impact assessment, guidelines

FORMATS: Downloadable PDF document, 51 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.unhcr.org/cgi-bin/texis/vtx/home (UNHCR)

http://www.unhcr.org/3b03b2a04.html(guidelines)

ABOUT THE TOOL: First elaborated in 1996, this updated version of the Guidelines has been compiled to further assist governments, partners and field staff in better understanding and appreciating the need for careful and consistent approaches to environmental management. There are three main objectives to these guidelines:

  • To describe the basis for incorporating environmental factors into specific UNHCR guidance/guidelines and programs. Environmental issues are cross-sectoral by nature, and environmental considerations have to be introduced in a consistent and coordinated manner into all relevant sectoral activities, as stipulated by the reformulated environmental policy approved by the 46th session of the Executive Committee of UNHCR (EXCOM 1995).
  • To provide more detailed information and the rationale behind the EXCOM policy statement.
  • To serve as an awareness-raising tool for UNHCR and other agencies involved with refugee and returnee operations.

The guidelines also seek to provide a framework within which UNHCR and implementing partner staff, in particular, will be able to:

  • Identify and evaluate the range of some of the most common environmental impacts associated with a specific refugee or returnee situation;
  • Identify and evaluate opportunities to undertake positive environmental interventions and determine the balance of advantages and disadvantages of these interventions; and
  • Select interventions that best combine the interests of the refugees, those of the receiving country, donors and UNHCR.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: “The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees was established on December 14, 1950 by the United Nations General Assembly. The agency is mandated to lead and co-ordinate international action to protect refugees and resolve refugee problems worldwide. Its primary purpose is to safeguard the rights and well-being of refugees. It strives to ensure that everyone can exercise the right to seek asylum and find safe refuge in another State, with the option to return home voluntarily, integrate locally or to resettle in a third country. It also has a mandate to help stateless people.”

INTENDED USER: UNHCR

GREENING THE BLUE HELMETS: ENVIRONMENT, NATURAL RESOURCES, AND UN PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

AUTHOR: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UN Department of Field Support (DFS), and UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO)

LAST UPDATED: May 2012

TYPE OF TOOL: Report

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, humanitarian action, environmental management, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UN Department of Field Support (DFS), UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), report, water, fuel and energy, minerals, land and land use

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 134 pages

LANGUAGES: English, French

WEB LINK:

http://www.unep.org/disastersandconflicts/Introduction/EnvironmentalCooperationforPeacebuilding/GreeningtheBlueHelmetsReport/tabid/101797/Default.aspx (UNEP site)

http://postconflict.unep.ch/publications/UNEP_greening_blue_helmets.pdf (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This report aims to provide a comprehensive overview of how peacekeeping operations affect and are affected by natural resources and environmental conditions. The report is divided into two main parts. Part 1 reviews the environmental management of peacekeeping operations and showcases good practices, technologies and behaviors that have already been adopted. Part 2 examines the role that peacekeeping operations have played in stabilizing countries where violent conflicts have been financed by natural resources – including diamonds, gold, timber and oil – or driven by grievances over their ownership, access and control.”

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “UNEP, established in 1972, is the voice for the environment within the United Nations system. UNEP acts as a catalyst, advocate, educator and facilitator to promote the wise use and sustainable development of the global environment. The Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) is dedicated to assisting the Member States and the Secretary-General in their efforts to maintain international peace and security. The Department of Field Support (DFS) provides dedicated support to peacekeeping field missions and political field missions.

INTENDED USER: “This report is addressed to three main sets of actors namely: policy makers at UN agencies and Member States; peacekeeping personnel including military, police, and civilian staff and senior leadership; and DFS mission support staff, including engineers, environmental officers, logisticians and other field operators.”

POLICY BRIEF: HIGH-VALUE NATURAL RESOURCES AND POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: October 2013

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, guidelines, minerals, restoration

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/books/complete-case-study-listing/ (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the first in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resources management; it draws upon findings from High-Value Natural Resources and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by Päivi Lujala and Siri Aas Rustad (London: Earthscan 2012).”

This policy brief provides guidance on the key components of managing high-value resources for peacebuilding. Among them:

  • Assessing the resource base and local resource economies
  • Strengthening institutional quality and resource governance
  • Managing resource extraction and maximizing revenues and benefits
  • Sharing and investing resource revenues
  • Mitigating negative social and environmental impacts

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between high-value natural resources and conflict

POLICY BRIEF: ASSESSING AND RESTORING NATURAL RESOURCES IN POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: June 2013

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, land and land use, guidelines, restoration, impact assessment

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 6 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_132.pdf (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This policy brief is the second in a series of peacebuilding and natural resources policy briefs; it summarizes findings from Assessing and Restoring Natural Resources in Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by David Jensen and Steve Lonergan (London: Earthscan 2012).”

This policy brief provides guidance on the key components of assessing and restoring natural resources in post-conflict peacebuilding. Among them:

  • Post-conflict environmental assessment to identify resource-related impacts, risks, opportunities, and needs
  • Remediation of environmental hot spots to protect human health and support emergency employment
  • Restoration of damaged or degraded resources to support livelihoods ad reduce disaster vulnerability
  • Reconstruction that minimizes adverse environmental and social impacts

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding

POLICY BRIEF: LAND AND POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: October 2013

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, land and land use, guidelines, restoration

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_136.pdf (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the third in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resources management; it summarizes findings from Land and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by Jon Unruh and Rhodri C. Williams (London: Earthscan 2013).”

This policy brief provides guidance on key approaches to post-conflict land management. Among them:

  • Clarifying legal ambiguities
  • Addressing legal pluralism
  • Resolving land disputes
  • Ensuring the right to return, restitution, and compensation
  • Supporting recovery and restoration of productive land
  • Reforming land policies
  • Rebuilding the land administration
  • Allocating land to excombatants

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between land management and conflict.

POLICY BRIEF: WATER AND POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: March 2014

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, water, guidelines, restoration

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_425.pdf (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the fourth in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management; it draws upon findings from Water and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by Erika Weinthal, Jessica Troell, and Mikiyasu Nakayama (London: Earthscan 2014).”

This policy brief provides guidance on how to:

  • Involve stakeholders in decision making
  • Prioritize, sequence, and coordinate water interventions
  • Invest in resilient water infrastructure and adaptive management
  • Assess institutions and rebuild capacities for water governance
  • Engage the informal sector
  • Use water as a platform cooperation and confidence building

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: “Practitioners in international development and humanitarian initiatives, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between water management and conflict.”

POLICY BRIEF: NATURAL RESOURCE PROGRAMMING IN POST-CONFLICT SITUATIONS

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: March 2014

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, guidelines, restoration

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_426.pdf (pdf)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the eighth in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management (NRM). This brief highlights strategies used by natural resource management practitioners to adapt to and address the unique operational challenges faced in post-conflict contexts.”

This policy brief provides guidance on how to

  • Align NRM with peacebuilding priorities
  • Address the conflict economy and illicit use of natural resources
  • Rebuild NRM governance, institutions, and capacities
  • Design programs that can adapt to volatility, rapid change, and persistent insecurity
  • Focus on rebuilding sustainable and resilient livelihoods
  • Recognize legal pluralism and work to clarify resource rights
  • Strengthen gender equity in NRM
  • Use shared natural resources as a platform for cooperation and reconciliation
  • Adopt conflict-sensitive approaches to NRM programs

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between natural resource management and conflict.

INTEGRATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN HUMANITARIAN PROGRAMMING: THE ENVIRONMENT MARKER

AUTHOR: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

LAST UPDATED: December 2012

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), guidelines, impact assessment

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 2 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.unep.org (UNEP)

https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/system/files/documents/files/Integration%20of%20environmental%20issues%20in%20humanitarian%20programming.pdf (tool)

ABOUT THE TOOL: This document provides a simple framework that is meant to assist humanitarian agencies and their responsible project officers in:

  • “Contextualizing projects given the environmental vulnerabilities of areas they are located in.
  • Assessing projects for potential negative environmental impacts.
  • Mitigating those impacts by modifying the project design, or compensating for negative impacts.
  • Enhancing environmental benefits in the project“

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “UNEP, established in 1972, is the voice for the environment within the United Nations system. UNEP acts as a catalyst, advocate, educator and facilitator to promote the wise use and sustainable development of the global environment.”

INTENDED USER: Humanitarian agencies and their responsible project officers

ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS ASSESSMENT IN POST DISASTER SITUATIONS: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

AUTHOR: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

LAST UPDATED: March 2008

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), guidelines, impact assessment, restoration, fuel and energy, water, shelter

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 45 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.unep.org (UNEP)

http://postconflict.unep.ch/publications/UNEP_PDNA_draft.pdf (tool)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This guide is not intended to present a blueprint of how to conduct an environmental needs assessment given that practically every situation will have its own particular concerns. It should, however, help provide some proven basic guidance on:

a)      how an ENA team – or Team Leader at least – might organize themselves prior to conducting the ENA, as well as during subsequent stages of the assessment;

b)      some key issues which the ENA team and decision-makers might need to consider;

c)      approaches that should be respected during specific stakeholder consultations;

d)      how non-cluster specific cross-cutting issues and concerns such as gender and governance might be integrated into the various lines of questioning and assessments; and

e)      how the collected information might be presented in a format suitable for quick and easy reading and referral.

The guide has been designed with a view to helping people take each of the modules and adapt these, as necessary, to particular situations.”

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “UNEP, established in 1972, is the voice for the environment within the United Nations system. UNEP acts as a catalyst, advocate, educator and facilitator to promote the wise use and sustainable development of the global environment.”

INTENDED USER: “This guide is intended for use by anyone concerned with environmental, and related, impacts occurring in a post-disaster situation. It should be of particular relevance to those interested in ensuring that environmental issues are taken into account from the earliest possible moment of planning for early recovery.”

“The ENA guide has been written with the expectation of it being used primarily by a core group of people who might constitute an Environmental Needs Assessment Team (ENAT), though in particular the ENA Team Leader.”