POLICY BRIEF: HIGH-VALUE NATURAL RESOURCES AND POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: October 2013

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, guidelines, minerals, restoration

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/books/complete-case-study-listing/ (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the first in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resources management; it draws upon findings from High-Value Natural Resources and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by Päivi Lujala and Siri Aas Rustad (London: Earthscan 2012).”

This policy brief provides guidance on the key components of managing high-value resources for peacebuilding. Among them:

  • Assessing the resource base and local resource economies
  • Strengthening institutional quality and resource governance
  • Managing resource extraction and maximizing revenues and benefits
  • Sharing and investing resource revenues
  • Mitigating negative social and environmental impacts

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between high-value natural resources and conflict

POLICY BRIEF: ASSESSING AND RESTORING NATURAL RESOURCES IN POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: June 2013

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, land and land use, guidelines, restoration, impact assessment

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 6 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_132.pdf (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This policy brief is the second in a series of peacebuilding and natural resources policy briefs; it summarizes findings from Assessing and Restoring Natural Resources in Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by David Jensen and Steve Lonergan (London: Earthscan 2012).”

This policy brief provides guidance on the key components of assessing and restoring natural resources in post-conflict peacebuilding. Among them:

  • Post-conflict environmental assessment to identify resource-related impacts, risks, opportunities, and needs
  • Remediation of environmental hot spots to protect human health and support emergency employment
  • Restoration of damaged or degraded resources to support livelihoods ad reduce disaster vulnerability
  • Reconstruction that minimizes adverse environmental and social impacts

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding

POLICY BRIEF: LAND AND POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: October 2013

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, land and land use, guidelines, restoration

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_136.pdf (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the third in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resources management; it summarizes findings from Land and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by Jon Unruh and Rhodri C. Williams (London: Earthscan 2013).”

This policy brief provides guidance on key approaches to post-conflict land management. Among them:

  • Clarifying legal ambiguities
  • Addressing legal pluralism
  • Resolving land disputes
  • Ensuring the right to return, restitution, and compensation
  • Supporting recovery and restoration of productive land
  • Reforming land policies
  • Rebuilding the land administration
  • Allocating land to excombatants

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between land management and conflict.

POLICY BRIEF: WATER AND POST-CONFLICT PEACEBUILDING

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: March 2014

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, water, guidelines, restoration

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_425.pdf (PDF)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the fourth in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management; it draws upon findings from Water and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, edited by Erika Weinthal, Jessica Troell, and Mikiyasu Nakayama (London: Earthscan 2014).”

This policy brief provides guidance on how to:

  • Involve stakeholders in decision making
  • Prioritize, sequence, and coordinate water interventions
  • Invest in resilient water infrastructure and adaptive management
  • Assess institutions and rebuild capacities for water governance
  • Engage the informal sector
  • Use water as a platform cooperation and confidence building

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: “Practitioners in international development and humanitarian initiatives, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between water management and conflict.”

POLICY BRIEF: NATURAL RESOURCE PROGRAMMING IN POST-CONFLICT SITUATIONS

AUTHOR: Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, and the University of Tokyo

LAST UPDATED: March 2014

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: conflict sensitivity, environmental management, Environmental Law Institute (ELI), United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), McGill University, University of Tokyo, guidelines, restoration

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 8 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/publications/policy-briefs/

http://www.environmentalpeacebuilding.org/assets/Documents/LibraryItem_000_Doc_426.pdf (pdf)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This is the eighth in a series of policy briefs on post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management (NRM). This brief highlights strategies used by natural resource management practitioners to adapt to and address the unique operational challenges faced in post-conflict contexts.”

This policy brief provides guidance on how to

  • Align NRM with peacebuilding priorities
  • Address the conflict economy and illicit use of natural resources
  • Rebuild NRM governance, institutions, and capacities
  • Design programs that can adapt to volatility, rapid change, and persistent insecurity
  • Focus on rebuilding sustainable and resilient livelihoods
  • Recognize legal pluralism and work to clarify resource rights
  • Strengthen gender equity in NRM
  • Use shared natural resources as a platform for cooperation and reconciliation
  • Adopt conflict-sensitive approaches to NRM programs

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “From 2008 to present, the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the University of Tokyo, and McGill University have led a five-year global research initiative to analyze experiences in post-conflict peacebuilding and natural resource management, identify lessons, and raise awareness of those lessons among practitioners, researchers, and decision makers.  The initiative is producing six edited books (published by Earthscan) that include over 150 case studies and other analyses from more than 60 conflict-affected countries and territories, written by 225 researchers, practitioners, and decision makers from around the world.  A seventh overarching book (published by Cambridge University Press) synthesizes the findings across resources, peacebuilding activities, and countries.  Building on this unprecedented body of research, we are converting learning into action, while we continue to examine approaches to more effectively manage resources to support peacebuilding.”

INTENDED USER: Practitioners, researchers, policy makers, students, and others interested in post-conflict peacebuilding and the nexus between natural resource management and conflict.

ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS ASSESSMENT IN POST DISASTER SITUATIONS: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR IMPLEMENTATION

AUTHOR: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

LAST UPDATED: March 2008

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), guidelines, impact assessment, restoration, fuel and energy, water, shelter

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 45 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINK:

http://www.unep.org (UNEP)

http://postconflict.unep.ch/publications/UNEP_PDNA_draft.pdf (tool)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This guide is not intended to present a blueprint of how to conduct an environmental needs assessment given that practically every situation will have its own particular concerns. It should, however, help provide some proven basic guidance on:

a)      how an ENA team – or Team Leader at least – might organize themselves prior to conducting the ENA, as well as during subsequent stages of the assessment;

b)      some key issues which the ENA team and decision-makers might need to consider;

c)      approaches that should be respected during specific stakeholder consultations;

d)      how non-cluster specific cross-cutting issues and concerns such as gender and governance might be integrated into the various lines of questioning and assessments; and

e)      how the collected information might be presented in a format suitable for quick and easy reading and referral.

The guide has been designed with a view to helping people take each of the modules and adapt these, as necessary, to particular situations.”

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “UNEP, established in 1972, is the voice for the environment within the United Nations system. UNEP acts as a catalyst, advocate, educator and facilitator to promote the wise use and sustainable development of the global environment.”

INTENDED USER: “This guide is intended for use by anyone concerned with environmental, and related, impacts occurring in a post-disaster situation. It should be of particular relevance to those interested in ensuring that environmental issues are taken into account from the earliest possible moment of planning for early recovery.”

“The ENA guide has been written with the expectation of it being used primarily by a core group of people who might constitute an Environmental Needs Assessment Team (ENAT), though in particular the ENA Team Leader.”

HANDBOOK FOR ESTIMATING THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF DISASTERS

AUTHOR: United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)

LAST UPDATED: 2003

TYPE OF TOOL: Handbook

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), handbook, restoration, shelter, fuel and energy, water, impact assessment

FORMAT: Downloadable PDF document, 111 pages

LANGUAGES: English, Spanish

WEB LINK:

http://www.cepal.org/default.asp?idioma=IN (ECLAC)

http://www.recoveryplatform.org/assets/tools_guidelines/Handbook_for_Estimating_Socioeconomic2003.pdf (handbook)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This new version of the ECLAC Handbook describes the methods required to assess the social, economic and environmental effects of disasters, breaking them down into direct damages and indirect losses and into overall and macroeconomic effects.

The Handbook focuses on the conceptual and methodological aspects of measuring or estimating the damage caused by disasters to capital stocks and losses in the production flows of goods and services, as well as any temporary effects on the main macroeconomic variables. This new edition also contemplates both damage to and effects on living conditions, economic performance and the environment.

The Handbook describes a tool that enables one to identify and quantify disaster damages by means of a uniform and consistent methodology that has been tested and proven over three decades. It also provides the means to identify the most affected social, economic and environmental sectors and geographic regions, and therefore those that require priority attention in reconstruction. The degree of detail of damage and loss assessment that can be achieved by applying the Handbook will, however, depend on the availability of quantitative information in the country or region affected. The methodology presented here allows for the quantification of the damage caused by any kind of disaster, whether man-made or natural, whether slowly evolving or sudden. The application of the methodology also enables one to estimate whether there is sufficient domestic capacity for dealing with reconstruction tasks, or if international cooperation is required.”

ABOUT THE AUTHORS: “ECLAC, which is headquartered in Santiago, Chile, is one of the five regional commissions of the United Nations. It was founded with the purpose of contributing to the economic development of Latin America, coordinating actions directed towards this end, and reinforcing economic ties among countries and with other nations of the world. The promotion of the region’s social development was later included among its primary objectives.”

INTENDED USER: Countries and communities affected by disasters; organizations responsible for assessing the social, economic, and environmental effects of disasters.

THE SPHERE HANDBOOK: HUMANITARIAN CHARTER AND MINIMUM STANDARDS IN HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE

AUTHOR: The Sphere Project

LAST UPDATED: 2011

TYPE OF TOOL: Handbook

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, The Sphere Project, handbook, risk reduction, shelter, water, restoration

FORMATS: Handbook available for purchase in 18 languages; open-access website available in Arabic, English, French, and Spanish; Training modules in English

LANGUAGES: Arabic, Armenian, Bangla, Braille (English), Chinese (Simplified), English, French, German, Haitian Creole, Indonesian, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Kyrgyz, Nepali, Russian, Sinhala, Slovenian, Spanish, Tamil, Urdu, Vietnamese

WEB LINKS: http://www.sphereproject.org/handbook/ (handbook); www.SphereHandbook.org (web site)

ABOUT THE TOOL: The Sphere Handbook: Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Humanitarian Response, is one of the most widely known and internationally recognized sets of common principles and universal minimum standards in life-saving areas of humanitarian response.  The Sphere Handbook is designed for planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation during humanitarian response. It is also an effective advocacy tool when negotiating for humanitarian space and for the provision of resources with authorities. Furthermore, it is useful for disaster preparedness activities and contingency planning, with donors increasingly including the standards in their reporting requirements.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: In 1997, a group of humanitarian non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement initiated the Sphere Project.  The Sphere Project is a voluntary initiative that brings a wide range of humanitarian agencies together around a common aim–to improve the quality of humanitarian assistance and the accountability of humanitarian actors to their constituents, donors and affected populations.  They based Sphere’s philosophy on two core beliefs: first, that those affected by disaster or conflict have a right to life with dignity and, therefore, a right to assistance; and second, that all possible steps should be taken to alleviate human suffering arising out of disaster or conflict.

INTENDED USER: The principal users of the Sphere Handbook are practitioners involved in planning, managing or implementing a humanitarian response. This includes staff and volunteers of local, national and international humanitarian agencies. In the context of fund-raising and project proposals, the minimum standards are also frequently referred to. Other actors, such as government and local authorities, the military or the private sector, are also encouraged to use the Sphere Handbook. It may be useful in guiding their own actions, but also in helping them to understand the standards used by the humanitarian agencies with whom they may interact.

EMERGENCY SHELTER ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND ACTION CHECKLIST

AUTHOR: Global Shelter Cluster

LAST UPDATED: frequent periodic updates

TYPE OF TOOL: Guidelines

KEYWORDS: humanitarian action, environmental management, Shelter Cluster, guidelines, shelter, impact assessment, restoration

FORMAT: Downloadable Word document, 48 pages

LANGUAGES: English

WEB LINKS:

https://www.sheltercluster.org/Pages/default.aspx (shelter cluster)

https://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:i1zbo4hBND8J:https://www.sheltercluster.org/sites/default/files/docs/Shelter%2520Environmental%2520Impact%2520Assessment%2520and%2520Action%2520Tool.doc+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=safari (checklist)

ABOUT THE TOOL: “This Emergency Shelter Environmental Impact Assessment and Action Checklist provides emergency shelter project managers and field staff a means to:

  • Quickly assess shelter-related environmental impacts and,
  • Quickly identify practical local actions to address these impacts.

The Checklist is explicitly designed for emergency and transitional shelter situations. The Checklist does not replace (but can supplement) full and formal environmental impact assessments for permanent reconstruction of shelter or related infrastructure.

The Checklist focuses on four stages in the shelter life cycle:

  1. Selection of the shelter site
  2. Construction of buildings and infrastructure on the site,
  3. Management of the site while it is occupied, and
  4. Decommissioning (closing) of a site when it is no longer needed.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: The Global Shelter Cluster (GSC) is an Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) coordination mechanism that supports people affected by natural disasters and internally displaced people affected by conflict with the means to live in safe, dignified and appropriate shelter. The GSC enables better coordination among all shelter actors, including local and national governments, so that people who need shelter assistance get help faster and receive the right kind of support.

INTENDED USER:  Emergency shelter project managers and field staff

ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISOR OF THE SHELTER COORDINATION TEAM (SCT) AND RELATED GUIDANCE

AUTHOR: Shelter Cluster Team, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies(IFRC)

LAST UPDATED: 2017

TYPE OF TOOL: Knowledge platform

KEYWORDS: environmental management, Shelter Cluster Team, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies(IFRC), knowledge platform, guidelines, handbooks, shelter, restoration, risk reduction, impact assessment

FORMAT: Web site. Specific tools available primarily in English

LANGUAGES: Arabic, English, French, Portuguese, Spanish

WEB LINKS:

https://www.sheltercluster.org/Pages/default.aspx (global shelter cluster)

https://www.sheltercluster.org/sites/default/files/docs/700400-shelter_coordination_team-en-lr.pdf (guidance)

ABOUT THE TOOL: The Shelter Cluster website makes available a wide array of guidelines, planning toolkits, and handbooks related to contingency planning, settlement planning, shelter specifications, shelter programming, non-food items, cross-cutting aspects, and cluster coordination.  At the global level, the aim of the cluster approach is to strengthen system-wide preparedness and technical capacity to respond to humanitarian emergencies by ensuring that there is predictable leadership and accountability in all the main sectors or areas of humanitarian response.  Similarly, at the country level the aim is to strengthen humanitarian response by demanding high standards of predictability, accountability and partnership in all sectors or areas of activity. The cluster approach can be used in both conflict-related humanitarian emergencies and in disaster situations.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: The Global Shelter Cluster (GSC) is an Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) coordination mechanism that supports people affected by natural disasters and internally displaced people affected by conflict with the means to live in safe, dignified and appropriate shelter. The GSC enables better coordination among all shelter actors, including local and national governments, so that people who need shelter assistance get help faster and receive the right kind of support.

INTENDED USER:  This toolkit is designed for use by coordination teams deployed by the Emergency Shelter Cluster co-chairs UNHCR and IFRC to chair in-country Emergency Shelter Cluster Working Groups.