Category: Common Place Book

Commonplace Book Entry #7: Fleming Quote

” [A]n education [. . .] that was designed to support a truly direct, deliberative democracy [. . .] would be an education oriented to the ‘strong publics’ of decision-making rather than the ‘weak publics’ of opinion formation.” (205)

In this quote, Fleming comments on education and how he believes it should allow individuals to form their own opinions. By definition, a deliberative democracy is a form of democracy in which deliberation is central to decision making. To deliberate, is to thoughtfully weigh your options before making a decision. Fleming is correct when saying a deliberative democracy would create “strong publics of decision making.” He believes the education system should teach individuals how to form their own opinion rather than simply memorizing or conforming to someone else’s. I have seen both of these ideas in past assignments. Sometimes I am asked to form my own opinions, and other times I shape my answer around what I know my teacher wants. Fleming prefers an education system where students are required to form their own opinions and to make their own decisions.

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Commonplace Book Entry # 6: Paramedic Method

Prepositional Phrases

Linking Verbs

Original Paragraph:

Built in 1968, Potomac Gardens Apartments is a public housing project owned by the District of Columbia Housing Authority. The complex is located at 1225 G Street SE,  just thirteen blocks southeast of the United States Capitol Building. The 352 units that make up the complex are divided into family and senior housing. The large, run-down, and bleak looking building houses low income families and a large senior population. It would be easy to walk past Potomac Gardens writing it off as just another old building in need of fresh paint, but there is more to the building that what first meets the eye. Potomac Gardens Apartments has a rich history filled with violence and controversy.

New Paragraph:

The District of Columbia Housing Authority’s complex, Potomac Gardens, was built in 1968. Located at 1225 G Street SE, the complex sits just thirteen block southeast of the United States Capitol Building. 352 units make up the complex. These units are divided into both family and senior housing. The large, run-down, and bleak looking building houses low income families and a large senior population. It would be easy to walk past Potomac Gardens writing it off as just another old building, but there is more to the building that what first meets the eye. Potomac Gardens Apartments has a rich history filled with violence and controversy.

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Commonplace Book Entry #5: Georgia Referendum

“Shall Property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?”

The root sentence is: Should student housing be exempt from taxes? The four words that jump out to me are property, university, exempt, and taxation. We do not know where this sentence is from, but it may be a proposal for new legislation. Although, the question is written using simple language, it is difficult to understand. The author did this on purpose, so readers can make up their own interpretation. The sentence poses a question: should University of Georgia student housing be exempt from taxes? The author poses the question in a way that expects a response.

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Commonplace Book #4: Gender Inclusive Bathrooms

The sign below explains that the bathroom is gender neutral/gender inclusive and was most likely written by someone from AU Housing and Dining. The sign explains the concept of a gender neutral bathroom, addresses any possible concerns, and then provides a solution to these concerns. What I find strange about the sign is the last statement. If AU is trying to make gender inclusive bathrooms the new “norm” on campus, why are they allowing people to opt out by locking the door. Locking the door seems to defeat the entire purpose of the all inclusive bathroom. How are you supposed to adjust to a new situation by avoiding it entirely?

commonplace-book-assignment

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Commonplace Book: Entry 3

“Art should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable.”

– Cesar Cruz

Root Sentence: Art (noun) should (verb) comfort and disturb (describes the verb)

“the disturbed” and “the comfortable” describe who art should comfort and disturb.

“and” is a coordinating conjunction used to combine both parts of the sentence.

New Sentence: Innovation must strengthen the unsettled and unsettle the strong.

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Commonplace Book Entry 2: The Conversation

Bolded sentences = “I say”

“Legal scholars addressing constraints on behavior traditionally focus on regulation through law, which is often termed simply “regulation.” However, as Lawrence Lessing has asserted, tools besides law may constrain or regulate behavior, and those tools function as additional forms of regulation. These include norms, markets, and architecture. While many legal scholars have begun to consider both norms, and markets in their work, here I focus on the regulatory role of architecture. The built environment does not fit within the definition of “regulation” as legal scholars traditionally employ that term; it in not a rule promulgated by an administrative body after a notice-and-comment period. However, the built environment does serve to regulate human behavior and is an important form of extra-legal regulation” (Schindler 1943-1944). 

This is a paragraph from part 1 of Sarah Schindler’s article “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation through Physical Design of the Built Environment.” The “They say” in this introduction are the references to both legal scholars and Lawrence Lessing. Schindler references the opinions of legal scholars, and the research of Lawrence Lessing to strengthen her main point which is found in the last sentence. The “I say” in this introduction is the last sentence, where Schindler introduces her point. In the next paragraph she backs up her claim by referencing more sources.

“Most Americans’ image of public housing is of a large concentration of run-down high-rise building in a major city—crime-ridden and inhabited by the poorest of the poor. The principles of defensible space help to explain why crime rates in such projects are both so high and so hard to bring under control. There are, indeed, many such projects, but this single image of public housing is something of a media distortion. In 1989 one- and two- story structures accounted for almost one-third of the 1.4 million public housing units nationwide. Buildings with three to six stories accounted for almost another quarter. Defensible space techniques have had considerable success in several smaller scale developments, and they have made at least some dent in the crime problems of certain high-rise developments. I believe this approach can me highly cost effective and should be applied much more widely” (Cinsneros 19).

This paragraph is from Henry Cisneros’ article “Defensible Space: Deterring Crime and Building Community. I believe the “they say, I say” format is seen twice. Cisneros begins the introduction referencing the opinions of “most Americans” and then goes on to state one of his main points. Next, information about public housing in 1989 is provided. This information is cited from another source and therefore another “they say.” In the final sentences, Cisneros states his opinion, making the last sentences the “I say.”

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Commonplace Book: Entry 1

Sentences from my public health listeriosis case study:

1. ”The babies had been born in the previous two weeks in towns in the western part of Pennsylvania. They were not well.”

The babies had been born in the previous two weeks in towns in the western part of Pennsylvania, and they were not well.

The babies had been born in the previous two weeks in towns in the western part of Pennsylvania; they were not well.

2. ”The babies were not part of the outbreak. Their PFGE patterns had not matched the outbreak strain.”

The babies were not part of the outbreak; their PFGE patterns had not matched the outbreak strain.

The babies were not part of the outbreak because their PFGE patterns had not matched the outbreak strain.

3. ”She was the oldest; she had a brother and sister who were twins.”

She was the oldest. She had a brother and sister who were twins.

She was the oldest since she had a younger brother and sister who were twins.

4. ”Taupe was an internist approaching fifty whose thick hair had gone prematurely silver; he sported a formidable mustache and almost always wore a bowtie.”

Taupe was an internist approaching fifty whose thick hair had gone prematurely silver. He sported a formidable mustache and almost always wore a bowtie.

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