Annotated Bibliography 9 and 10

Background

Ledbetter, Danielle. “Is D.C. Still the Chocolate City?” Truth Be Told, 10 Nov. 2015, http://truthbetold.news/2015/11/is-d-c-still-the-chocolate-city/.

In their article Is D.C. Still The Chocolate City authors Danielle Ledbetter and Kaylah Waite give the history of Washington D.C. being one of the “blackest” cities in the United States since the 1970s this reiterating the fact that was is seen today does not match the history of what D.C. has been. Ledbetter and Waite explaining the story behind the nickname of “Chocolate City” for the nation’s capital explaining how the Shaw area was “booming” with black businesses. There are such phrases as “white flight” “The Plan” and “take back” explaining how the idea of white families and individuals moving into areas such as Shaw has been something that has been occurring since the 1950s. The idea of displacement then has is not a new twenty-first century phenomenon rather, it has been happening is the dawn of the “Chocolate City” era and now the population has just gotten larger. Phrases such as “black constituents” are used to explain in thorough detail of the mass of minority individuals and families that walked around the areas where nowadays might not be more than a handful of minority families in sight.

I would use this particular article for the statistics that has within in to help the reader actually visualize the differences throughout the years of the displacement that has gone on in areas such as Shaw. Having such article use the nickname of “Chocolate City” to be the name of D.C.is almost surprising and knowing the story behind that is an important part of the telling the stories of my built-in environment.

 

Argument

Schwartzman, Paul. “A Bittersweet Renaissance.” The Washington Post, 23 Feb. 2006. washingtonpost.com, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/22/AR2006022202508.html.

In this 2006 article, Bittersweet Renaissance Paul Schwartzman interviews natives of Washington D.C. neighborhoods such as Shaw giving them a way to discuss the changes they have seen in they have seen in their neighborhoods and the effects of such changes. Schwartzman breaks down such interviews into subsections that help the reader understand the processes of the changes. When it comes to the “Vanishing Culture” the idea and power of money when it comes to the changing of the neighborhoods around the metropolitan area and the impact it has not only on the people but also on the areas history.

I plan on using this as part of my multimodal final project as direct quotes to help the audience understand the standpoint that many natives have concerning the changes in their area.  To have different direct statements and testimonies from natives that grew up in the area before and after the changes that it is undergoing would help my audience understand that this is a serious matter that affects individuals greatly.

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