Monthly Archives: October 2016

Gender: An Emerging Industry and Transitioning World

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In herarticle, “His & Hers: Designing for a Post-Gender Society,” Suzanne Tick explains how the design industry and the private sector as a whole is leading the way in tolerance of other genders.  Our current society often doesn’t accommodate or even recognize those individuals who don’t identify within the gender binary.  This situation has caused confusion for many who are trying to design for the coming acceptance of genders other than boy and girl.  Designers and private companies are spearheading the movement for gender recognition.

“Transgender Rally” [1]

The fact that alternative gender practices are becoming mainstream is a breakthrough in our modern world that has the potential to change history.  Throughout all of human history, culture and community has been based around the roles of male and female.  This is changing.  As Tick puts it, “We are living in a time of gender revolution.”  Many individuals, especially those of a younger generation are coming to terms with the existence of differing genders and gender identity.  Historically, certain tasks, attitudes, and demeanors have been associated with male/female roles, but now the walls of this binary are crumbling.  This has led to confusion among not only those who don’t identify with the common genders, but every interaction can be made awkward and uncomfortable.  With this newfound freedom in sexuality and identity, many businesses and individuals must work towards understanding and incorporating these issues.

“Drag Protest, 1966” [2]

The job of cooperating with this “gender revolution” has become especially difficult for the design industry due to deeply entrenched social norms.  Everybody knows the stereotypes of girl and boy design.  Boys have blue, girls have pink.  Boys wear jeans, girls wear skirts.  Boys like violent action toys, girls like dolls.  The list goes on and on, but for many, they don’t identify with these patterns.  Design has been working hard to incorporate these an androgynous view into their products to cater towards these outcast members.  These changes can be seen in fashion from products like “Alexander Wang’s women’s coat,” that has a “has masculine tailoring with a military look”(Tick).  The article also describes the introduction of makeup lines designed specifically for men.  The design industry is changing how society views gender.

“Gendered Colors” [3]

The private sector as a whole is having a significant impact on gender relations in the United States.  Companies are doing this in a variety of ways, but the most important is the inclusion of gender-neutral bathrooms in the office.  The inclusion of these allows for people who identify with other genders to “feel comfortable, safe, and included”(Tick).  In order to reach true equality in the workplace, these companies must be willing to include non-binary people into discussion.  Other institutions such as colleges are challenging the gender norm as well.  Many students are refuting the binary and refuse to put their genders on applications and papers.  The fight against gender norms is strong in the private sector.

“Gender Neutral Bathroom” [4]

As many people feel disillusioned by the breaking of gender norms, the private sector along with designers have taken up the burden of catering towards these individuals.  By allowing an outlet for these people to identify with, it allows them to feel more included by society at large.  No more are they outcasts because of how they feel, and are able to operate normally within society.  This is all thanks to the hard work the organizations are doing for the non-binary community.

 


Works Cited

Sources: Tick, Suzanne. “His &Amp; Hers: Designing for a Post-Gender Society.” Metropolis Magazine, Metropolis, Mar. 2015, http://www.metropolismag.com/march-2015/his-or-hers-designing-for-a-post-gender-society/.

Images:

  1. http://media.tumblr.com/1d10b0acb0bb0e045d74aaf629c1d779/tumblr_inline_mkcwlujqVb1qz4rgp.jpg
  2. https://broadly-images.vice.com/images/articles/meta/2016/05/12/the-first-raucus-trans-riot-that-history-almost-forgot-turns-50-this-year-1463061460.jpg?crop=0.996632996633xw:1xh;center,top&resize=1000:*&output-quality=70
  3. https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s–hOuoDWiv–/c_fit,fl_progressive,q_80,w_636/18iyo73m6ejpyjpg.jpg
  4. http://studentmedia.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Gender-Neutral-Bathroom.jpg

Return to Nature: How College Campuses Can Improve Student’s Well-Being

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The idea that nature can affect one’s spirit is explored in “Recognizing Campus Landscapes as Learning Spaces,” by Kathleen G. Scholl and Gowri Betrabet Guwaldi.  In their article, they argue that the inclusion of nature to the physical environment of college campuses can have a positive impact on the mental well being of the students.  Citing numerous academic studies, they draw conclusions using an organized system of student-nature interactions to compare the students attitudes to their environment.  The addition of natural objects such as trees, grass, and water installations on university campuses improve the cognitive functions of students.

“Amherst College” [1]

Higher education has always been a place for reflection, and their original design helped the health of students.  Some of America’s first institutions were built in rural areas for the sole purpose of getting away from everything.  Along the lines of famous thinkers such as Thoreau, these universities were created as a place that is separate from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.  They were places where one could learn just as much about themselves as they did about law, politics, or business.  The campus was a community surrounded by nature.  As time moved on actions such as the Morrill Act of 1862 and other federal land grants had colleges incorporate the nature on campus as part of learning (Scholl and Guwaldi, 2015).  Examples of these hands-on activities could be seen in agriculture and forestry.  The end of the second World War also resulted in a change to the United States’ higher education.  The rapid influx of GIs returning to school and the dawn of the Cold War (which pressured the US to focus on science and engineering) required more buildings to be built for a multitude of purposes.  Soon, less and less natural space was available on campuses; time had eroded the areas once used for self reflection and contemplation to shallow, monotonous buildings.

“GI Bill” [2]

While each time period utilized nature on campus differently, modern researchers believe that more nature can lead to more productive students.  According to the authors, the presence of nature has a calming effect on individuals which allows for non-artificial stress relief.  Nature allows a place where one can be studious, yet at the same time, they enjoy the peaceful serenity of our environment.  Landscape designer Frederick Law Olmstead stated, “natural scenery employs the mind without fatigue and yet exercises it.” The high tech, always connected world of today builds pressure on students, who have no ways to relieve it on many modern campuses.  The problem many colleges have is what exactly defines nature.  Does nature mean a single potted plant sitting on a desk in some office or does it mean a massive park lined by trees with an ornate marble fountain in the center?  While one is obviously more grandiose than the other, any feature that is “of nonhuman origin that people ordinarily can perceive” is considered by the authors to be nature (Scholl and Guwaldi, 2015).  Any type of nature is helpful towards the mental health of pupils.

“Oxford Map” [3]

There are a variety of ways institutions with differing available space can introduce nature to their campuses.  Those campuses with very little outdoor space have a few options.  As mentioned previously, a good start is to incorporate potted plants and small water features in buildings.  The use of glass to let in natural sunlight also provides a basic foothold towards bigger features.  For urban campuses with some outdoor space, the use of rooftop gardens or fountains can provide some space for reflection and tranquility.  Rural and suburban campuses have the most room (literally) for flexibility.  Depending on the environment, forests and wooded areas provide an amazing space for stress relief.  Large quadrangles and parks on campus also give it a more open feel, and give the students more freedom of movement.  These campuses are still able and should be using agricultural spaces such as farms and greenhouses for academic studies.  There are a myriad of options for campuses to improve both natural features and their students health.

“Greenhouse” [4]

Nature on campus is one of the key elements towards the stress levels of students.  If campuses are able to learn from those in the past, they may be able to improve the lives of those pupils in the university.  Our institutions must bring back the campus as a place for reflection as well as learning.  The return to nature is a simple process if it is done efficiently and these small changes could help college students across the country.

“Ohio State” [5]

 

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Works Cited

Sources:

Issue, By. “Recognizing Campus Landscapes as Learning Spaces | Scholl | Journal of Learning Spaces.” Recognizing Campus Landscapes as Learning Spaces | Scholl | Journal of Learning Spaces, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, 2015, https://via.hypothes.is/http://libjournal.uncg.edu/jls/article/view/972/777.

Images:

  1. https://www.amherst.edu/system/files/media/First-Year%2520Quad%2520Pano%2520%25281%2529%25201000×368.jpg&__=1382984753
  2. https://www.historians.org/Images/GI%20Roundtable/SchoolCover.jpg
  3. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2f/John_Speed’s_map_of_Oxford,_1605..jpg
  4. http://www.cobleskill.edu/academics/schools/agriculture-and-natural-resources/plant-science/images/campus-gardens/asset-greenhouse3.jpg
  5. https://www.osu.edu/assets/images/features/2014/pb_autumn2014/pb_orton_large.jpg

Common Place Entry 5

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Georgia Referendum to Amend State Constitution:

“Shall Property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?”

 

The root structure of this sentence could be summed up in the sentence:

Shall property be exempt from taxation?

 

Three or four words that jump out at me in the sentence are:

Property, in reference to buildings and land owned by educational institutions in Georgia

Utilized, discussing the what the providers of student housing are doing with the land

Continue, as it means that the law is already in effect and an amendment would solidify it’s place in the Georgia constitution

Affordable, because it is citing the purpose of keeping the land tax exempt

 

The rhetorical situation in this context is that the owners of universities and colleges within the state of Georgia wish to have their property remain tax exempt to prevent rising costs for students.  The intended audience is the people/representatives of Georgia, specifically the students who this affects directly.  The “encoder” who are the owners write it in this way to convince the government why their land should be tax exempt by stating a rational argument.  

 


Image: http://beattye.pbworks.com/f/1209530146/georgiastatehouse.jpg

 

Urban Combat: A Bloody History and the Changing Future of S Street

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“1968 Riots” [1]

The cozy brick townhouses encapsulate the street.  Freshly planted trees and small patches of grass line the narrow sidewalks.  The air smells clean, as clean as an urban environment can smell at least.  People walking up and down with smiles on their faces as they continue on with their day.  Little do many of these people know that their friendly little neighborhood was a warzone little over a decade ago.  And even fewer know about the headquarters at the center of it all as they stroll past it.

“S Street Bust” [2]

The house of the deceased Garnell A. Campbell stands nestled between the New Community Church and the row of brick buildings that run up and down S Street.  It isn’t the nicest place on the block by far, but it doesn’t appear to be a terrible place to live.  After all it is a cozy 126-year old townhouse in an up and coming area.  However, I’m sure any potential buyer of 618 S Street NW would be turned off by the activities that occurred there.  That address was the residence of the aforementioned Garnell A. Campbell, but was better known by his street name: “Baldie”.  The quaint porch out front is where Baldie sat on an almost daily basis and looked out over “his” street.  The fact that a chair still sits there gives the house an eerie feeling, as if Baldie’s presence is still there.  The area is far different from how Baldie left it when he was dragged out in handcuffs in the early nineties.  

img_0969

This is the former residence of Garnell “Baldie” Campbell. It’s located next door to the New Community Church as described in S Street Rising by Ruben Castaneda. Aside from the security bars on the windows (which were most likely there when Baldie was around, either that or no one dared to mess with him) it doesn’t look like a former drug den. The tight brickwork is similar to many other houses in the neighborhood, but this and a few of the neighboring houses don’t look as nice as some of the renovated houses on the street. The porch out front is where Baldie spent his days looking out over his empire.

The sounds of gunfire have since left S Street.  Replacing them are the hustle and bustle of everyday life, and to most people this is viewed as good thing.  However, there are deeper issues rooted in the “beautification” of the area.  Much of the area close to 14th Street, specifically the Shaw neighborhood of which S Street was a part of, was once a vibrant, black community.  This block of streets was the cultural capital of the African-American community; some claiming it could give even Harlem a run for its money.  That was until the DC riots of 1968 in the wake of Martin Luther King Jr’s assassination.  Washington was on the fire and the black community suffered the most, leading to many neighborhoods never recovering.  S Street was one of those neighborhoods, and over the years violence, crime, and drugs crawled in.  By the late 1980s and early 1990s, the street really did look like a warzone.  Following the war on drugs, much of the area was thoroughly combed through.  This affected primarily the black community in the neighborhood.

 

untitled

This archive is information on the value of Baldie’s house from homesnap.com. It’s shocking to see the estimated value of the home to be $856,300 on S Street of all places. The value of the townhouse shows one how drastically the neighborhood has changed. This transformation can be seen in even greater detail when looking at the last sale price of $380,000 in 2006. The area has been renovated to incredible levels, and this rise of prices easily explains the gentrification of the area over the past few years.

baldieclipping

This is a clipping from the classifieds section of the July 12, 1994 Washington Post. Here one can see the name Garnell Campbell, also known as Baldie. The date of its appearance coincides with the general timeframe in which he was arrested. Due to his arrest the city would have seized his house which is evident here. It’s also interesting to note the price it was being sold at ($394,000). Much like the previous record, there is a large jump in value in the late 2000s, the value only increasing by $76,000 between 1994 and 2006. This can put the rate of gentrification into perspective.

It’s amazing to see the contrast of the impoverished, predominately black area and the upscale, far whiter neighborhood of today.  Safety has increased, which was proven in what I saw when I visited.  As I stood outside the home of Baldie a day care group in strollers went down the street.  I was amazed to think this was the same street that twenty years ago had been one of the most dangerous places in America.  To further add to that irony was that the children were passing by the house of one of the most infamous drug lords of the city.  Just up the street from Baldie’s house lies the Shaw-Howard metro stop.  Using the timeline feature on google maps, one can see just how much the neighborhood has changed in the last 10 years.  In 2009, the area next to the metro was a small park with plenty of open space and a few benches.  By 2011, it was a construction zone and by 2014, a massive, glass building had taken its place.  The removal of this park was sure to have an affect on the neighborhood, but the fact that such a fancy modern building rose up in an area that used to be so violent so few years ago is shocking.  

img_0967

This is an example of how S Street has changed in the past few years. Two decades ago, walking a group of day care children down this street would have been unthinkable due to the amount of violence that took place there. Not only that, but they walked right past Baldies house and probably had no idea who once lived there. It was an amazing contrast to the condition of the neighborhood during the time of S Street Rising.

img_0959

This large, glass building stands next to the Shaw-Howard metro stop. A building such as this would have been unthinkable to construct on S Street in the past. The construction replaced a park in the area in the early 2010s. Inside houses the United Negro College Fund and Teach for America. It’s ironic that a building for helping black youth probably gentrified an area to be built. This is yet another stark contrast to the S Street of before.

Baldie’s house was the epicenter for drug activity on S Street, but now it doesn’t look the part.  Currently, it fits in nice and snug with the rest of the newly developed street in stark contrast to what it used to be.  The neighborhood has changed, but the history that still rests there is a reminder of a gruesome past.  The outwards appearance of a place can tell a lot about it, but sometimes it requires a little digging to discover it’s true past.


 

Annotated Bibliography

“Addiction Battled Ambition For Reporter Caught In D.C.’s Crack Epidemic.” NPR. NPR, n.d. Web. 06 Oct. 2016.

This source was a brief interview given by Castaneda about his time on S Street.  It gives a description of the neighborhood and provides details on its atmosphere.  It also talks about how Baldie respected the neighboring church and how he would take care of it like a home.  It mentions how Baldie died in prison which could be an entry point for the discovery of a death certificate which may provide more information on how Baldie lived.  One may be able to follow a path from his death to his life on S Street.

 

Classified ad 3 — no title. (1994, Jul 12). The Washington Post (1974-Current File)

This record provided data on the seizure of Baldie’s home.  It lists Garnell Campbell as one of the individuals whose property had been confiscated by the city due to his arrest.  It lists the price of his residence at $304,000.  This can be seen as an exhibit of facts for an argument about changes in housing prices.

 

@Homesnap. “618 S Street NW, Washington, DC 20001.” Homesnap. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Oct. 2016.

This website provided information on the current value of Baldie’s house.  The house, located at 618 S Street, is worth close to a million dollars now, which is crazy to think about if you go back just a few years.  It isn’t just because the house was cleaned up, but because of the gentrification in the neighborhood which led to the rise of the area as the new, hip part of DC.

 

Schwartzman, Paul. “Amid Glittering Renewal, Violence Evokes a Neighborhood’s Bloody past.” Washington Post. The Washington Post, 30 Aug. 2015. Web. 12 Oct. 2016.

This source is interesting as it was written by the same author nine years after the previous article.  They both share a similar concept, but in this article he describes the, “thicket of new gleaming towers, health clubs and hipster-happy cafes and restaurants” (Schwartzman 2015).  This article is written after the full gentrification and transformation of the neighborhood has been completed.  This is a fascinating glimpse into how any area can change so fast.

 

Schwartzman, Paul. “A Bittersweet Renaissance.” Washington Post. The Washington Post, 23 Feb. 2006. Web. 12 Oct. 2016.

This article from the Washington Post provides an argument against the gentrification of the Shaw neighborhood and more specifically S Street.  Since the days when Baldie lived on S Street, the area has changed a lot.  Schwartzman documents the beginnings of this change in 2006 and discusses how the culture of the neighborhood was beginning to vanish.

 

“United States of America v. Garnell A. Campbell, Also Known As Baldie, Appellant, 72 F.3d 920 (D.C. Cir. 1995).” Justia Law. Justia, n.d. Web. 06 Oct. 2016.

This citation provides background information on Baldie’s case.  The source gives a brief description of the trial including the presiding judges and the evidence that was displayed on trial.  Included in the evidence is a videotape from 1620 S Street NW, the house in which Baldie was arrested.  This address allows one to start to trace a map of the activities on S Street, including not only Baldie’s home, but his “workplace” as well.  The date of the trial and case identification could also prove useful, if in the future one needs to look up further information on either Baldie’s trial or use the information to provide a better description of the local, urban environment.  The title of the case also allows one to further research the court hearing from there and potentially gather more information on some of the locations mentioned on S Street.  This information can provide a deeper glimpse into the life of Baldie during his reign as kingpin of S Street.

Images:

[1] http://i.huffpost.com/gen/2774284/original.jpg

[2] http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2014/07/02/raid_wide-375d2ae8524c4e63fdd1822695bb1f1f96cb4b30-s900-c85.jpg

 

Digital Archive

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Digital Archive #1:

img_0969

This is the former residence of Garnell “Baldie” Campbell.  It’s located next door to the New Community Church as described in S Street Rising by Ruben Castaneda.  Aside from the security bars on the windows (which were most likely there when Baldie was around, either that or no one dared to mess with him) it doesn’t look like a former drug den.  The tight brickwork is similar to many other houses in the neighborhood, but this and a few of the neighboring houses don’t look as nice as some of the renovated houses on the street.  The porch out front is where Baldie spent his days looking out over his empire.  

 

Digital Archive #2:

img_0967

This is an example of how S Street has changed in the past few years.  Two decades ago, walking a group of day care children down this street would have been unthinkable due to the amount of violence that took place there.  Not only that, but they walked right past Baldies house and probably had no idea who once lived there.  It was an amazing contrast to the condition of the neighborhood during the time of S Street Rising.

 

Digital Archive #3:

img_0959

This large, glass building stands next to the Shaw-Howard metro stop.  A building such as this would have been unthinkable to construct on S Street in the past.  The construction replaced a park in the area in the early 2010s.  Inside houses the United Negro College Fund and Teach for America.  It’s ironic that a building for helping black youth probably gentrified an area to be built.  This is yet another stark contrast to the S Street of before.

 

Digital Archive #4:

untitled

This archive is information on the value of Baldie’s house from homesnap.com.  It’s shocking to see the estimated value of the home to be $856,300 on S Street of all places.  The value of the townhouse shows one how drastically the neighborhood has changed.  This transformation can be seen in even greater detail when looking at the last sale price of $380,000 in 2006.  The area has been renovated to incredible levels, and this rise of prices easily explains the gentrification of the area over the past few years.

 

Digital Archive #5:

baldieclipping

This is a clipping from the classifieds section of the July 12, 1994 Washington Post.  Here one can see the name Garnell Campbell, also known as Baldie.  The date of its appearance coincides with the general timeframe in which he was arrested.  Due to his arrest the city would have seized his house which is evident here.  It’s also interesting to note the price it was being sold at ($394,000).  Much like the previous record, there is a large jump in value in the late 2000s, the value only increasing by $76,000 between 1994 and 2006.  This can put the rate of gentrification into perspective.

Commonplace Entry 4

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The bathroom sign is a rhetorical device used to describe something that may be unusual to the common person.  Most people are used to the traditional male/female bathroom divide, but this sign put up by the AU Housing and Dining breaks from that norm.  The sign is trying to convince people to use the gender neutral bathroom even if it is different from what they know.  The sign is split up into three distinct sections divided by paragraph.  The first section identifies what the room is used for and how it differs from other bathrooms.  The second explains to people that they shouldn’t view the gender neutral bathroom as a negative thing.  Finally, the third section allows a sort of compromise for those who do feel uncomfortable using the new bathroom.  Overall, the purpose of the sign is to convince those who don’t like the idea of using the gender neutral bathroom to become more comfortable with the idea.

Annotated Bibliography 1

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“United States of America v. Garnell A. Campbell, Also Known As Baldie, Appellant, 72 F.3d 920 (D.C. Cir. 1995).” Justia Law. Justia, n.d. Web. 06 Oct. 2016.

This citation provides background information on Baldie’s case.  The source gives a brief description of the trial including the presiding judges and the evidence that was displayed on trial.  Included in the evidence is a videotape from 1620 S Street NW, the house in which Baldie was arrested.  This address allows one to start to trace a map of the activities on S Street, including not only Baldie’s home, but his “workplace” as well.  The date of the trial and case identification could also prove useful, if in the future one needs to look up further information on either Baldie’s trial or use the information to provide a better description of the local, urban environment.  The title of the case also allows one to further research the court hearing from there and potentially gather more information on some of the locations mentioned on S Street.  This information can provide a deeper glimpse into the life of Baldie during his reign as kingpin of S Street.

 

“Addiction Battled Ambition For Reporter Caught In D.C.’s Crack Epidemic.” NPR. NPR, n.d. Web. 06 Oct. 2016.

This source was a brief interview given by Castaneda about his time on S Street.  It gives a description of the neighborhood and provides details on its atmosphere.  It also talks about how Baldie respected the neighboring church and how he would take care of it like a home.  It mentions how Baldie died in prison which could be an entry point for the discovery of a death certificate which may provide more information on how Baldie lived.  One may be able to follow a path from his death to his life on S Street.