Category Archives: commonplace

Commonplace #5

Jeremy Kramer

11/3/2016

 

Common Place

 

 

 

“Shall Property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?”

 

“Shall Property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?”

 

What is noticeable to me about this legislative proposal are the lines: “utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities” and “continue to be exempt from taxation”

I believe what this bill is trying to do is twofold. The first is that it is trying to let third parties who are not part of the university, but instead contractors profit but not having to pay any taxes. The second thing which is going on in this bill is that by having it on the ballot, the legislative representatives are attempting to remove any responsibility to whether or not it passes. What this signals to me is that this bill does not benefit the tax payers of Georgia, but instead special interest groups.

Commonplace 6

 

Jeremy Kramer

11/3/2016

Commonplace 6

 

Original: According to the SBLT, I analyze (but more importantly) input data by looking at all the elements and then seeing how they interact with one another, by doing this I am able to see the most basic parts of the process from a rational angle at which I am able to reduce a complex idea or situation into its most basic parts. This rational way of thinking and inputting data thus makes it very easy for me to describe complex ideas or events to people. Where all this information I gather will lead me or how it will help me, I do not know.

 

Revised: According to the SBLT, I interpret received data by looking at all the parts in seeing how they interact. This method allows me to view the process from a rational angle at which I am able to reduce a complex idea or situation into its most basic parts. This allows me to easily describe complex ideas or events to people. I am unsure what I will do with this newly gained knowledge.

Commonplace 2

The Problem with an Operationally Nuclear North Korea by: Gregory J. Moore:

Miss Sasaki went back to her office and sat down at her desk. She was quite far from the windows, which were off to her left, and behind her were a couple of tall bookcases containing all the books of the factory library, which the personnel department had organized. She settled herself at her desk, put some things in a drawer, and shifted papers. She though that before she began to make entries in her lists of new employees, discharges, and departures for the Army, she would chat for a moment with the girl at her right. Just as she turned her head away from the windows, the room was filled with a blinding light. She was paralyzed by fear, fixed still in her chair for a long moment…Everything fell, and Miss Sasaki lost consciousness. The ceiling dropped suddenly and the wooden floor above collapsed in splinters and the people up there came down and the roof above them gave way; but principally and first of all, the bookcases right behind her swooped forward and the contents threw her down, with her left leg horrible twisted and breaking underneath her. There, in the tin factor, in the first moment of the atomic age, a human being was crushed by books.

They say I say: This passage reflects Graff’s they say I say because Moore is using Miss Sasaki’s firsthand experience to show the power of nuclear weapons on a human scale.

 

 

The Harlem Renaissance by: Marie E. Rodgers

In 1919, soldiers returned home from the Great War, World War 1. Many Black and White Veterans became disillusioned by the lack of economic opportunity. However, unrest had been brewing among African American soldiers even before then.

They say I say: This passage reflects Graff’s they say I say because Rodgers uses the African American experience post-war to show how other people reacted before Rodgers goes into the history of the Harlem Renaissance.

Commonplace 4

This sign, which is located in front of a number of bathrooms on AUs campus, begin by stating what its purpose it exactly, that being an indicator that the bathroom it marks is gender inclusive. It explains in few short and concise words, what its purpose is and why it is important that it exists in the first place. The sign concludes with presenting a possible solution which might help all people relieve themselves of potential uneasiness which they might feel from using such a designated (or undesignated) spot.

What I find peculiar is that if t offers the solution to just lock the doors. I find this particularity odd is that why would a common action for anyone using the bathroom (i.e.: locking the door after they enter), be considered the best course of action? Why was this considered the best course as opposed to potentially many others?commonplace_book_assignment_1024-225x300

Commonplace: Entry 1

I went to the mall; I forgot to get socks

  • I went to the mall; I forgot to get socks.
  • I went to the mall. I forgot to get socks.

 

  • I forgot to get socks. When I went to the mall.

 

  • I forgot to get socks; when I went to the mall. 

 

Puffing and panting; we trudged up the last section of the hill.

1) Puffing and panting; we trudged up the last section of the hill.

2) Puffing and panting. We trudged up the last section of the hill.

3) We trudged up the last section of the hill; puffing and panting.

4) We trudged up the last section of the hill. Puffing and panting.

 

I cannot understand why our professor insists upon full bibliographies; because they’re not really necessary, are they?

  • I cannot understand why our professor insists upon full bibliographies. They’re not really necessary, are they?
  • I cannot understand why our professor insists upon full bibliographies;because they’re not really necessary, are they?
  • They’re not really necessary, are they? I cannot understand why our professor insists upon full bibliographies.
  • They’re not really necessary, are they; I cannot understand why our professor insists upon full bibliographies.