Social Action Project

This year I sought to research how the COVID-19 pandemic has greatly increased rates of intimate partner violence. In the fall of 2020, my research sought to answer the question of: If, in the past, domestic violence rates have spiked when people have stayed at home for extended periods of time, could we then anticipate an increase in the domestic violence rate amid the coronavirus lockdown? While my research has shown that domestic violence rates have spiked when people have stayed at home for extended periods, the same trend is impacting current rates of domestic violence amid the COVID-19 lockdown and general pandemic. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration report high rates of intimate partner violence and child abuse in the United States before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, due to living in reduced space for extended periods, rates of “intimate terrorism” and domestic violence as a whole have increased (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration 1). This trend informs the fact that during the COVID-19 pandemic, domestic violence rates have increased worldwide, putting families, especially women and children, at an increased risk. Past trends of times when people have stayed at home for extended periods help to inform the solutions to the current increase in rates of domestic violence. After performing extensive research in the fall of 2020, I crafted a social action project this past spring to raise awareness of the increased rates and the available virtual resources for survivors. My research compiled resources while spreading statistics to the general public through social media sites such as Instagram and Facebook.

SPA-362 Policy Memo