Category: Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliographies 7 & 8

Cohn, V. “D.C. Gap in Wealth Growing; Uneducated Suffer most, Study Shows.” The Washington Post, Jul 22, 2004, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “D.C. Gap in Wealth Growing; Uneducated Suffer most, Study Shows,” author V. Cohn addresses the increasing wealth disparity between the rich and poor in Washington, D.C. Cohn begins by stating, “the gap has grown more here [Washington D.C.] than in most places.” Next, Cohn goes on to inform the reader about a recently published study by by the D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute. The study shows, “the top 20 percent of the city’s households have 31 times the average income of the 20 percent at the bottom. The gap in the District is fed by extremes at both ends: The poor have less average income than in most of the country’s 40 largest cities, and the rich have more.” This issue presents a striking contrast between two social classes. Washington, D.C. is a particularly interesting case since in recent years, “the poor have gotten poorer and the rich have gotten richer,” says Stephen Fuller, a regional economist at George Mason University in Fairfax. Next, Cohn incorporates Tony Bullock’s opinion. Bullock is a spokesman for Mayor Anthony A. Williams. According to Bullock, “the gap is the product of complex forces, including poor city services and poor schooling, that have persisted for decades and cannot be fixed overnight.” It is very smart of Cohn to include Bullocks perspective, since it adds validity to his arguments. Politicians typically only discuss topics of importance which shows this issue is no joke. Cohn concludes the article by discussing a new bill to increase the minimum wage and gives his input that the government should focus their efforts on education and proper training for employees.

In Conversation

This article is crucial to my final project since it is all about the wealth disparity in Washington, D.C. The main goal of my project is to address the poor-rich dichotomy in the area around Gonzaga College High School. On one hand, there are ultra-luxurious apartments, but on the other hand, there are homeless shelters right across the street.

 

Brown, Emma. “Jesuit Priest Led Gonzaga College High for 16 Years.” The Washington Post, Oct 30, 2010, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Jesuit Priest Led Gonzaga College High for 16 Years,” written by Emma Brown, she discusses the death of Rev. Allen P. Novotny and the way in which the Gonzaga College High School community united. Rev. Allen P. Novotny was a Jesuit priest who overlooked a huge fundraising campaign and renovation at Gonzaga College High School. Brown begins the article by providing some background information. She explains, “Father Novotny arrived in 1994 at Gonzaga, a private Catholic high school that was founded in 1821 and has been at its current location at I and North Capitol St. since 1871.” Next, Brown goes on to address the enormous impact Rev. Allen P. Novotny had on the community while president. His most prominent accomplishment was raising over $30 million to renovate Gonzaga. After this, Brown inserts a quote from Stuart Long, a graduate from the class of 1960. Long remembers Rev. Allen P. Novotny and says, “He was a priest with an MBA, so he had a good handle on the business realities of life…he knew that the future of Gonzaga depended on it getting a much better physical plant.” Finally, Brown concludes the article by incorporating some politics. She writes, “when Martin O’Malley was inaugurated four years ago as Maryland governor, he invited the priest to officiate at a prayer breakfast preceding the ceremony.” Most people are familiar with Martin O’Malley, so bringing him into the article helps the reader make connections.

In Conversation

Part of my documentary, I want to interview an alumni from Gonzaga College High School to hear about their overall experience and what they did with the surrounding community. I will use the article to craft questions for alumni. I am interested if any of the students I encounter have ever met Rev. Allen P. Novotny or heard stories about him. If so, I will compare the facts in the article to what the students know or feel about the past president of their school.

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Annotated Bibliographies 5 & 6

Lazo, Luz. “As Metro Struggles, Capital Bikeshare Takes Bigger Role in Region’s Transit Network.” ProQuest Central, Nov 12, 2016, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “As Metro Struggles, Capital Bikeshare Takes Bigger Role in Region’s Transit Network,” written by Luz Lazo, she addresses the increased use of Capital Bikeshare as the Metro is becoming more and more unreliable. Lazo begins the article by quoting Allie Toomey, a resident of Pentagon City. Toomey particularly likes Capital Bikeshare over the Metro because, “It is a lot less hassle…I am in control of my commute. There is no traffic and no major incidents…you never know with Metro anymore.” It is very smart of Lazo to include this quote right off the bat because it proves this is a significant issue. Next, Lazo goes on to discuss Metro’s year-long maintenance program and its implications. These include single-tracking, partial shutdowns and massive delays. To validate her argument even further, Lazo quotes Jim Sebastian, a Washington D.C. transportation planner. Sebastian states that “People are discovering these other modes besides Metrorail during SafeTrack, and Capital Bikeshare is one of them.” After, Lazo pulls out numbers to back up her point. In line with the rapid growth Lazo previously described, she says, “Capital Bikeshare has expanded from the original 114 stations six years ago to 426 this month. Membership in the past two years has grown to 31,600 from 24,000. This month, the system reached nearly 15 million trips.” The statistics emphasize Lazos main argument and is proof. Lastly, the article concludes with another quote from Toomey proving how much easier Capital Bikeshare really is. Toomey says, “You can just grab a bike and drop it off somewhere. I don’t have to worry about storing a bike or having a bike stolen.” Putting this quote at the end of the article reinforces Lazo’s main intention: educate the reader on the increased use of Capital Bikeshare.

In Conversation

This article can be useful for my project since there is a Capital Bikeshare docking station right near Gonzaga College High School. When I interview students at Gonzaga College High School, I plan to ask them how they get to and from school everyday. I am curious if they ever use Capital Bikeshare as it is very close to their school. Also, I want to observe the Capital Bikeshare docking station near Gonzaga to find out what type of people are renting bikes from that location.

Djurdjic, Milena. “Washington DC Facing Family Homelessness Crisis.” Federal Information & News Dispatch, Inc, Lanham, 2013, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Federal Information & News Dispatch Inc. (VOA News) article titled “Washington DC Facing Family Homelessness Crisis,” written by Milena Djurdic, she addresses the increase of homeless families in Washington, D.C. Djurdic begins the article by stating that “more than a thousand families are homeless, including at least 1,800 children, a number that has risen almost 75 percent since the recession started in 2008.” By beginning with these harsh statistics, it catches the reader’s attention and shows this is a serious matter. Next, Djurdic goes on to give the example of Marcaus Scales, a disabled single father that has been homeless for a year. Djurdic then includes a quote from Scales in which he says, “I just got to constantly reassure her that things will get better, that it is only for a little bit.” Scales and his daughter live in a shelter which used to be a hospital. After introducing Marcaus Scales, Djurdic brings in Amber Harding, an attorney for the clinic. According to Harding, “the streets of Washington are home to anywhere between 1,200 and 3,000 homeless children. Too often, she says, these families are forced to move from place to place on an almost daily basis in order to find a safe place to stay.” These issues are real and frightening. Djurdic concludes the article where she started by quoting Scales. He says, “When you lose hope, you lose everything, and that is the only thing I have right now.” These touching words leave the reader with a lot of emotions. From Dijurdic’s standpoint, it is a very interesting placement of the quote.

In Conversation

This article contributes to my final project because I plan to talk with homeless people at the shelter around the corner from Gonzaga College High School. I want to get the perspective from both single people living at a shelter and also families. Also, I am interesting in finding out what the Gonzaga College High School student’s know about the increase in homeless families.

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Annotated Bibliographies 3 & 4

Wang, Yanan. “Massive Mural an Ephemeral Reminder of NoMa’s Past.” The Washington Post, Jun 25, 2015, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In the The Washington Times article titled “Massive Mural an Ephemeral Reminder of NoMa’s Past,” written by Yanan Wang, she writes about the evolution of the NoMa district and how one of the largest murals in Washington, D.C. is being torn down due to new development. She begins by addressing Cita Sadeli as the main artist of the mural. Sadeli along with 51 other artists worked together to create a colorful ground mural in an empty lot in NoMa. Nestled behind Union Station, the mural provides vibrant scenery for those driving by or looking out on the Metrorail Red Line. Next, Wang points out that the mural was commissioned by the NoMa Business Improvement District in partnership with Words Beats & Life, a nonprofit promoting hip-hop and art education in the city. Then Wang addresses the sad part that the large mural will soon vanish due to a multi-use development named Storey Park. This brings Wang into discussion with Dan Silverman, publisher of the PoPville blog. Wang includes a quote from Silverman in which he explains how many years ago, “…you went there to catch the bus or a cab to where you were actually going.” Unlike many authors, Wang gives the perspective of how people feel with this new development. She explains that “Not everyone is happy with where the neighborhood is going. On the corner of First and K streets NE, a handful of government workers sat outside Sandwiches by Philip on their lunch hour, gazing halfheartedly at the banners advertising Storey Park leases.” The article concludes with a quote from Sadeli. The artist says “I’m just hankering for the old NoMa.” Wang does an excellent job educating the audience on the NoMa area. She provides the proper amount of background knowledge to help the reader grasp the monumental impact of this mural being torn down.

In Conversation

This article is vital to my project since Gonzaga College High School is located in the NoMa district of Washington, D.C. All around the school, buildings are going up and the dynamic within the area are shifting. Just like the artist uses a mural to show the original NoMa, I plan to create a documentary to highlight the changes in recent year. While the area around Gonzaga is changing, Gonzaga has remained true to its original traditions.

 

Alexander, Keith. “Outsourcing the Picket Line; Carpenters Union Hires Homeless to Stage Protests.” The Washington Post, Jul 24, 2007, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Outsourcing the Picket Line; Carpenters Union Hires Homeless to Stage Protests,” written by Keith Alexander, he writes about the use of homeless people in a staged protest. Alexander begins by setting the scene for the rest of the article. He says, “The picketers marching in a circle in front of a downtown Washington office building chanting about low wages do not seem fully focused on their message.” Next, Alexander addresses the issue that the people engaging in protest for better union rights are not actually part of The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council of Carpenters. Instead, they were paid $8 an hour. The Union hired people unemployed from homeless shelters. Then Alexander includes a quote from one of the protestors Tina Shaw, who lives in a women’s shelter. She simply says, “I’m here for the cash.” The most interesting part of the article is when Alexander writes about William R. Strange. Strange began “working as a for-hire picket two years ago when he lived in a homeless shelter on New York Avenue. He is now paid $12 an hour because he plays the buckets during the demonstrations.” Alexander continues and gives an update that Strange now owns an apartment. The article concludes with a quote from Strange where he says, “Every day I turn that key to my apartment, I feel great. I owe that to the picketing.” Alexander does a great job at addressing both sides of the argument. On one hand it is corrupt that people fighting for better union rights don’t actually work for the union, but on the other hand, it provides a source of income to those in need.

In Conversation

This article will play a role in my final project because the protest took place near Gonzaga College High School. In my final project I will address the homelessness in the area by talking with homeless people on the streets. I plan to compile my interviews into a documentary which will highlight the poor-rich dichotomy. During my conversations, I am interested to find out if any of the homeless people I talk with have engaged in picketing.

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Annotated Bibliographies 1 & 2

McLaughlin, Moira E. “Boutique Condos to Take Place of Central Union Mission.” The Washington Post, Feb 16, 2013, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Boutique Condos to Take Place of Central Union Mission,” written by Moira E. McLaughlin, she discusses the gentrification of the 14th Street area of Washington D.C. and the implications it has on Central Union Mission. Central Union Mission has been located on 14th and R Street since 1983, but with recent development of fancy restaurants, niche stores and luxury apartment buildings, they are forced to find a new space. The article continues by stating, “construction is scheduled to begin on the mission, converting four buildings, which now sleep 140 homeless men a night, into boutique condos and retail space.” As a result, Central Union Mission will move to the old Gales School located at 65 Massachusetts Ave. NW. However, McLaughlin mentions the shelter will have to stay in a temporary space while Gales School is being renovated. Next, McLaughlin includes a quotes from David Treadwell, Central Union Mission’s executive director. He says the new location “will allow us to reach poor and needy people who have been pushed out of the [NW] corridor, but still have great need for the services offered by Central Union Mission.” In order to further McLaughlin’s article, she brings in a quote from the architect of the new development at 14th Street. Colbert, the head architect makes a point to say he wants to “re-create the old storefronts that were there originally and really celebrate the historical components of the designs.” The article concludes with a quote from Jeffrey Schonberger, owner of the new building. He describes his new retailers will be “…high-end without question.” McLaughlin does a great job informing the audience about both sides of the transition. On one hand, the new development and the changing 14th Street, and the other, Central Union Mission.

In Conversation

This article is extremely important for my project since Central Union Mission relocated to the building formerly know as The Gales School, just around the corner from Gonzaga. For my project, I plan to visit Central Union Mission to get their take on being pushed out of an area and if it has impacted the number of homeless people they serve. I am going to do this by interviewing a employee at Central Union Mission. Also, I want to get a homeless person’s perspective on the issue of having to move shelters and what inconveniences are associated.

“Property Group Partners Acquires Fee Interest for the Development of $1.3 Billion ‘Capitol Crossing’ Project in Washington, DC.” Mergers & Acquisitions Week, 2012, pp. 81, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In the Mergers & Acquisitions Week article titled “Property Group Partners Acquires Fee Interest for the Development of $1.3 Billion ‘Capitol Crossing’ Project in Washington D.C.,” a news reporter informs about a commercial real estate company about to begin 2.2 million-square-foot of mixed-use development on three blocks of the recessed portion of Interstate 395 located in downtown Washington. The development will be named Capitol Crossing and will span seven acres, which is the largest piece of undeveloped land in Washington, D.C. Next, the article includes a quote from Jeffrey Sussman, president of Property Group Partners. Sussman explains Capitol Crossing “is by far the most creative project that we have ever tackled. Thanks to our partners and scores of District and Federal officials who helped us reach this point, we can now move forward to make this long-awaited dream a reality.” There will be a total of five buildings. Four commercial-use and one residential. All of the buildings will feature exclusive retail on the street-level. Then the reporter discusses the location of the new development. It is located close to Union Station, a bustling stop for tourists. The news reporter does a great job informing the reader about the new development and it’s specifications. However, the reporter does not address the impact it will have on the area which is crucial when conducting massive projects such as Capitol Crossing.

In Conversation

This article will be useful in my final project since Capitol Crossing will be built right around the corner from Gonzaga College High School. You can actually see the new development from Gonzaga College High School’s campus. It will be interesting to see what stores go into the retail space. When interviewing people, I plan to ask them how they feel about the construction and what they think it will do to the area. Take a look at Capitol Crossing’s website here.

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Annotated Bibliographies 9 & 10

McGraw, Eliza. “Learning by Heart at Gonzaga College High School, Volunteering for the Needy is a Key Part of the Curriculum.” The Washington Post Apr 09 2017 ProQuest.

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Learning by Heart at Gonzaga College High School, Volunteering for the Needy is a Key Part of the Curriculum,” written by Eliza McGraw, she explains the critical use of volunteerism in Gonzaga’s curriculum and how Gonzaga students stand out compared to students from other schools in the community service sector. She begins by explaining the story of Richard Hrdy, a senior at Gonzaga. Hrdy along with some of his classmates distribute food to the homeless in the surrounding area. Interestingly, Gonzaga is one of the most expensive private religious schools, but located in a low-income area of Washington D.C. McGraw explores the relationship Gonzaga students have to the physical area around them. Gonzaga is located near Union Station which is an area where homeless people tend to congregate. There is also a government housing project down the road from Gonzaga. Even though there is a gate all around Gonzaga, the students break down barriers and help the community around them. These strong values are at the core of a Jesuit education and are engrained in the students from a young age.

In Conversation

This article is particularly useful since it provides evidence that the students engage in the physical area around them. One would think that most students just go to school and take their classes but Gonzaga is different. I am going to use the article in my final project because I plan to break down the dichotomy of the wealthy private school situated in one of the poorest sections of D.C.

Kelly, John. “Gonzaga College High Takes a Day to Honor 48 Years of Dedicated Service.” The Washington Post, Sep 02, 2015, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Gonzaga College High takes a day to honor 48 years of dedicated service,” written by Kelly John, she discusses the recent death of a prominent Gonzaga teacher and how the community united as one. She begins by explaining that classes were cancelled on the day of John C. “Doc” Warman’s funeral. “Doc” suffered a heart attack and passed away in his classroom at 75 years. Kelly John goes on to explain how “Doc” was more than a teacher. He was even a student of Gonzaga College High School and graduated in 1957. Kelly John then incorporates quotes from two alumi, Ra’Mond Jamar and Shephard Hines members of the class of 2014. Both admired “the way Latin and Greek flowed off his tongue [it] was like poetry itself.” Next, the article points out how “Doc” was thoroughly involved in music. Doc sang the national anthem before every home basketball game and was musical director of Gonzaga’s shows. He also played piano in the small pit orchestra and was the choir director at Our Lady of Victory Church. At the end of the article Kelly John says one of the most moving statements when she writes, “An obituary would say that Doc had no children. Of course, he had thousands.” Overall, Kelly John does a great job at describing the celebration of life for John C. “Doc” Warman, a true inspiration to the Gonzaga community.

In Conversation

The article is useful for the final project since it is evidence that contributes to the strong sense of community within Gonzaga. It truly is a second “home” for many people. I am going to use this article to add to my argument that Gonzaga is more than an education. I plan to give the example of John C. “Doc” Warman and how he truly outlined the Jesuit mission, then compare it to Gonzaga’s website which states, “For an education to be truly “Jesuit,” we must help our students encounter, engage, and reflect upon their world.”

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