Tag: WRTGs17

Gonzaga College High School from H Street NW (Exterior/Political #5)

(Photo by Justin Maron)

This is a picture of an open parking lot located on H Street NW. To the left of the parking lot is the new development with Walmart, Starbucks, Capital One Bank and luxury rental apartments. To the right is 800 N. Capitol Street home to Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA). In the distance of the photo is Gonzaga College High School. Each time I’ve visited, this parking lot has been roped off with no cars. I wanted to include this picture since it shows the new construction on the left with Gonzaga’s old, historic buildings in the background, contrasting with the run-down parking lot in the foreground.

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Looking Out on Collins Courtyard (Exterior/Political #4)

(Photo taken by Justin Maron)

While in the library I made my way over to a window facing the Collins Courtyard. Before I continue, take a look at this map to get a feel for the location. Collins Courtyard is an open air brick space in the center of campus. It is located in between Ruesch/Cantwell Halls and the main buildings which are internconnected. As you can see in the picture, there are large trees and plants which take away from the city-feel. While I was visiting there were some students in the courtyard doing work and others were simply chatting. In the distance of the photo there are taller buildings on North Capitol St. Interestingly, Ruesch/Cantwell Halls are only two stories high. There is an old story at Gonzaga that when you are in the center of Collins Courtyard and clap your hands, you hear a faint squeaking noise. Some people say its due to sound waves, global warming, pesticides, Megabus parking lot nearby and even moles. However, nothing has been proven. Simply, the Gonzaga students perpetuate this old myth for fun. Check out this funny article on page 3 of the school newspaper here.

 

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The “G” Outside of Dooley Hall (Exterior/Political #3)

(Photo taken by Justin Maron)

Going off of the previous picture titled “Finally Past the Gates,” which could be found here, I continued to walk along the brick pathway. Just outside of Dooley Hall, I came across a huge letter “G” surrounded by bricks in a circular pattern. In order to get a feel for the location on campus, take a look at this map. The location of the “G” is particularly interesting because Dooley Hall is a very important building. It is the main entrance to the school, has all of the administrative offices, but most of all, the chapel. From an outsider the “G” is definitely overwhelming and large. It is seemingly impossible to miss this huge “G” when you visit Gonzaga College High School.

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Finally Past the Gates (Exterior/Political #2)

(Photo taken by Justin Maron)

I was finally able to get passed the gates during my most recent visit! My two prior trips to Gonzaga were on the weekend and there weren’t many people around. This time, I decided to visit during the week. This picture was taken just passed the large black gates which you can check out here. I spoke with a parent waiting to pick up their child on the other side of this walkway. Interestingly, she told me that this used to be a road open to the public which connected I Street. Recently, Gonzaga installed the black gates and added fancy brick pavers. Now, people are forced to drive around Gonzaga’s campus. While it keeps the campus safe and looks nice, it is definitely a burden for those that have to go from N. Capitol Street to 1st Street.

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Annotated Bibliographies 7 & 8

Cohn, V. “D.C. Gap in Wealth Growing; Uneducated Suffer most, Study Shows.” The Washington Post, Jul 22, 2004, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “D.C. Gap in Wealth Growing; Uneducated Suffer most, Study Shows,” author V. Cohn addresses the increasing wealth disparity between the rich and poor in Washington, D.C. Cohn begins by stating, “the gap has grown more here [Washington D.C.] than in most places.” Next, Cohn goes on to inform the reader about a recently published study by by the D.C. Fiscal Policy Institute. The study shows, “the top 20 percent of the city’s households have 31 times the average income of the 20 percent at the bottom. The gap in the District is fed by extremes at both ends: The poor have less average income than in most of the country’s 40 largest cities, and the rich have more.” This issue presents a striking contrast between two social classes. Washington, D.C. is a particularly interesting case since in recent years, “the poor have gotten poorer and the rich have gotten richer,” says Stephen Fuller, a regional economist at George Mason University in Fairfax. Next, Cohn incorporates Tony Bullock’s opinion. Bullock is a spokesman for Mayor Anthony A. Williams. According to Bullock, “the gap is the product of complex forces, including poor city services and poor schooling, that have persisted for decades and cannot be fixed overnight.” It is very smart of Cohn to include Bullocks perspective, since it adds validity to his arguments. Politicians typically only discuss topics of importance which shows this issue is no joke. Cohn concludes the article by discussing a new bill to increase the minimum wage and gives his input that the government should focus their efforts on education and proper training for employees.

In Conversation

This article is crucial to my final project since it is all about the wealth disparity in Washington, D.C. The main goal of my project is to address the poor-rich dichotomy in the area around Gonzaga College High School. On one hand, there are ultra-luxurious apartments, but on the other hand, there are homeless shelters right across the street.

 

Brown, Emma. “Jesuit Priest Led Gonzaga College High for 16 Years.” The Washington Post, Oct 30, 2010, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Jesuit Priest Led Gonzaga College High for 16 Years,” written by Emma Brown, she discusses the death of Rev. Allen P. Novotny and the way in which the Gonzaga College High School community united. Rev. Allen P. Novotny was a Jesuit priest who overlooked a huge fundraising campaign and renovation at Gonzaga College High School. Brown begins the article by providing some background information. She explains, “Father Novotny arrived in 1994 at Gonzaga, a private Catholic high school that was founded in 1821 and has been at its current location at I and North Capitol St. since 1871.” Next, Brown goes on to address the enormous impact Rev. Allen P. Novotny had on the community while president. His most prominent accomplishment was raising over $30 million to renovate Gonzaga. After this, Brown inserts a quote from Stuart Long, a graduate from the class of 1960. Long remembers Rev. Allen P. Novotny and says, “He was a priest with an MBA, so he had a good handle on the business realities of life…he knew that the future of Gonzaga depended on it getting a much better physical plant.” Finally, Brown concludes the article by incorporating some politics. She writes, “when Martin O’Malley was inaugurated four years ago as Maryland governor, he invited the priest to officiate at a prayer breakfast preceding the ceremony.” Most people are familiar with Martin O’Malley, so bringing him into the article helps the reader make connections.

In Conversation

Part of my documentary, I want to interview an alumni from Gonzaga College High School to hear about their overall experience and what they did with the surrounding community. I will use the article to craft questions for alumni. I am interested if any of the students I encounter have ever met Rev. Allen P. Novotny or heard stories about him. If so, I will compare the facts in the article to what the students know or feel about the past president of their school.

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Our Time for Change…Look Around You

Reading Analysis 5

In David Fleming’s final chapter of City of Rhetoric, he summarizes the main points made throughout the book, and argues that the only way to overcome adversity within cities is to find a new interest and work as one unit. Furthermore, Fleming suggests “to bring us closer physically and discursively, we will need to devote ourselves much more vigorously to building healthy, strong, diverse publics”(214). Therefore, from this we can see that Fleming still has hope for unified places in which all people work towards building a strong community. More specifically, Fleming brings this concept up by preaching “we need to learn a language of civic life…conflict over harmony”(205).

Fleming begins the final chapter titled “City of Rhetoric” by outlining what exactly a conclusion should do. Fleming says that conclusions “should leave us in an attitude of profound humility toward the built world”(195). Therefore, in this chapter, Fleming aims to tie all of the pieces of his book together and leave the reader with a final closing idea. For Fleming, this broad, conclusory idea is that “we need new designs and policies that bring us together without assimilating us together”(203). In other words, re-shaping society to be more inclusive and welcoming is not easy, however, with new legislation and a common goal it is possible. In addition, Fleming points out that it is crucial to not lose our unique characteristics, but rather join them together; cohabit.

To close out his book, City of Rhetoric, David Fleming leaves readers with complete optimism that united places are possible. In his final words he asks the reader to consider a few questions. These include: “What lessons do we learn from our cities today? Can they be refashioned to impart better lessons to our children and our children’s children? Now, as citizens in a complex society it is our duty to think about these things. Take a look around you.

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Arriving at Union Station (Exterior/Political #1)

(Photo taken by Justin Maron)

I took this picture when I arrived at Union Station. I rode the Metro to Gonzaga College High School because it is just a short 1/2 mile walk down the road. Find the Google Maps directions here. Even though I’ve been to Union Station many times, I am still amazed every time I emerge from the underground rail system. Coming up from the dark Metro to the bright open-air with carefully crafted arches and soaring dome ceilings, I don’t know where to look. The people, the sounds and the extraordinary view of our nation’s capital. Union Station is the epitome of an amalgam. People from all over walk through Union Station, many of which live in other states. However, people don’t just go to Union Station for transportation purposes. There are sit-down restaurants and high-end fashion stores. Check-out the directory of stores here. Many of the Gonzaga students take the Metro to and from school. On Gonzaga’s website they even have a “Directions” tab which you can look at here.

 

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Annotated Bibliographies 3 & 4

Wang, Yanan. “Massive Mural an Ephemeral Reminder of NoMa’s Past.” The Washington Post, Jun 25, 2015, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In the The Washington Times article titled “Massive Mural an Ephemeral Reminder of NoMa’s Past,” written by Yanan Wang, she writes about the evolution of the NoMa district and how one of the largest murals in Washington, D.C. is being torn down due to new development. She begins by addressing Cita Sadeli as the main artist of the mural. Sadeli along with 51 other artists worked together to create a colorful ground mural in an empty lot in NoMa. Nestled behind Union Station, the mural provides vibrant scenery for those driving by or looking out on the Metrorail Red Line. Next, Wang points out that the mural was commissioned by the NoMa Business Improvement District in partnership with Words Beats & Life, a nonprofit promoting hip-hop and art education in the city. Then Wang addresses the sad part that the large mural will soon vanish due to a multi-use development named Storey Park. This brings Wang into discussion with Dan Silverman, publisher of the PoPville blog. Wang includes a quote from Silverman in which he explains how many years ago, “…you went there to catch the bus or a cab to where you were actually going.” Unlike many authors, Wang gives the perspective of how people feel with this new development. She explains that “Not everyone is happy with where the neighborhood is going. On the corner of First and K streets NE, a handful of government workers sat outside Sandwiches by Philip on their lunch hour, gazing halfheartedly at the banners advertising Storey Park leases.” The article concludes with a quote from Sadeli. The artist says “I’m just hankering for the old NoMa.” Wang does an excellent job educating the audience on the NoMa area. She provides the proper amount of background knowledge to help the reader grasp the monumental impact of this mural being torn down.

In Conversation

This article is vital to my project since Gonzaga College High School is located in the NoMa district of Washington, D.C. All around the school, buildings are going up and the dynamic within the area are shifting. Just like the artist uses a mural to show the original NoMa, I plan to create a documentary to highlight the changes in recent year. While the area around Gonzaga is changing, Gonzaga has remained true to its original traditions.

 

Alexander, Keith. “Outsourcing the Picket Line; Carpenters Union Hires Homeless to Stage Protests.” The Washington Post, Jul 24, 2007, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Outsourcing the Picket Line; Carpenters Union Hires Homeless to Stage Protests,” written by Keith Alexander, he writes about the use of homeless people in a staged protest. Alexander begins by setting the scene for the rest of the article. He says, “The picketers marching in a circle in front of a downtown Washington office building chanting about low wages do not seem fully focused on their message.” Next, Alexander addresses the issue that the people engaging in protest for better union rights are not actually part of The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council of Carpenters. Instead, they were paid $8 an hour. The Union hired people unemployed from homeless shelters. Then Alexander includes a quote from one of the protestors Tina Shaw, who lives in a women’s shelter. She simply says, “I’m here for the cash.” The most interesting part of the article is when Alexander writes about William R. Strange. Strange began “working as a for-hire picket two years ago when he lived in a homeless shelter on New York Avenue. He is now paid $12 an hour because he plays the buckets during the demonstrations.” Alexander continues and gives an update that Strange now owns an apartment. The article concludes with a quote from Strange where he says, “Every day I turn that key to my apartment, I feel great. I owe that to the picketing.” Alexander does a great job at addressing both sides of the argument. On one hand it is corrupt that people fighting for better union rights don’t actually work for the union, but on the other hand, it provides a source of income to those in need.

In Conversation

This article will play a role in my final project because the protest took place near Gonzaga College High School. In my final project I will address the homelessness in the area by talking with homeless people on the streets. I plan to compile my interviews into a documentary which will highlight the poor-rich dichotomy. During my conversations, I am interested to find out if any of the homeless people I talk with have engaged in picketing.

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Annotated Bibliographies 1 & 2

McLaughlin, Moira E. “Boutique Condos to Take Place of Central Union Mission.” The Washington Post, Feb 16, 2013, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In The Washington Post article titled “Boutique Condos to Take Place of Central Union Mission,” written by Moira E. McLaughlin, she discusses the gentrification of the 14th Street area of Washington D.C. and the implications it has on Central Union Mission. Central Union Mission has been located on 14th and R Street since 1983, but with recent development of fancy restaurants, niche stores and luxury apartment buildings, they are forced to find a new space. The article continues by stating, “construction is scheduled to begin on the mission, converting four buildings, which now sleep 140 homeless men a night, into boutique condos and retail space.” As a result, Central Union Mission will move to the old Gales School located at 65 Massachusetts Ave. NW. However, McLaughlin mentions the shelter will have to stay in a temporary space while Gales School is being renovated. Next, McLaughlin includes a quotes from David Treadwell, Central Union Mission’s executive director. He says the new location “will allow us to reach poor and needy people who have been pushed out of the [NW] corridor, but still have great need for the services offered by Central Union Mission.” In order to further McLaughlin’s article, she brings in a quote from the architect of the new development at 14th Street. Colbert, the head architect makes a point to say he wants to “re-create the old storefronts that were there originally and really celebrate the historical components of the designs.” The article concludes with a quote from Jeffrey Schonberger, owner of the new building. He describes his new retailers will be “…high-end without question.” McLaughlin does a great job informing the audience about both sides of the transition. On one hand, the new development and the changing 14th Street, and the other, Central Union Mission.

In Conversation

This article is extremely important for my project since Central Union Mission relocated to the building formerly know as The Gales School, just around the corner from Gonzaga. For my project, I plan to visit Central Union Mission to get their take on being pushed out of an area and if it has impacted the number of homeless people they serve. I am going to do this by interviewing a employee at Central Union Mission. Also, I want to get a homeless person’s perspective on the issue of having to move shelters and what inconveniences are associated.

“Property Group Partners Acquires Fee Interest for the Development of $1.3 Billion ‘Capitol Crossing’ Project in Washington, DC.” Mergers & Acquisitions Week, 2012, pp. 81, ProQuest Central, http://proxyau.wrlc.org/login

Summary/Analysis

In the Mergers & Acquisitions Week article titled “Property Group Partners Acquires Fee Interest for the Development of $1.3 Billion ‘Capitol Crossing’ Project in Washington D.C.,” a news reporter informs about a commercial real estate company about to begin 2.2 million-square-foot of mixed-use development on three blocks of the recessed portion of Interstate 395 located in downtown Washington. The development will be named Capitol Crossing and will span seven acres, which is the largest piece of undeveloped land in Washington, D.C. Next, the article includes a quote from Jeffrey Sussman, president of Property Group Partners. Sussman explains Capitol Crossing “is by far the most creative project that we have ever tackled. Thanks to our partners and scores of District and Federal officials who helped us reach this point, we can now move forward to make this long-awaited dream a reality.” There will be a total of five buildings. Four commercial-use and one residential. All of the buildings will feature exclusive retail on the street-level. Then the reporter discusses the location of the new development. It is located close to Union Station, a bustling stop for tourists. The news reporter does a great job informing the reader about the new development and it’s specifications. However, the reporter does not address the impact it will have on the area which is crucial when conducting massive projects such as Capitol Crossing.

In Conversation

This article will be useful in my final project since Capitol Crossing will be built right around the corner from Gonzaga College High School. You can actually see the new development from Gonzaga College High School’s campus. It will be interesting to see what stores go into the retail space. When interviewing people, I plan to ask them how they feel about the construction and what they think it will do to the area. Take a look at Capitol Crossing’s website here.

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FAGE Yogurt and Humans

Commonplace 10

While eating a FAGE Total Split Cup yogurt earlier today I was intrigued by the unique concept of two distinct areas. One for the plain yogurt and another for the topping. However, when the fruit gets poured into the plain yogurt, it creates this magical taste. You see, the plain yogurt is so boring and the fruit by itself if way too sweet. But when they come together it’s just right.

FAGE Split Cup. Strawberry topping mixed with plain yogurt. (Photo derived from FAGE.com)

The complex packaging made me think about what else in life is separate, but when brought together so much better. People! Think about it, if one was to stay in their house all day and not interact with others, they would be depressed and have no clue about the world around them. Ideas are spread through human interaction. When two very different groups of people come together, the final result is diverse, leading to a unique output of work. Nevertheless, there could be problems when something like this occurs. In other words, people may have a hard time collaborating. So, next time you pour in your favorite yogurt topping, think about the underlying message.

FAGE offers a variety of flavors in the split cup. (Photo derived from FAGE.com)

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