New Yorkers Keep New York Safe

The image above is a post 9/11 campaign in New York City, “If you see something, say something,” was a response to the 2001 World Trade Center attack. The poster above can be found in New York city’s areas of public transportation, like train stations, bus stops, and  airports. “New Yorkers Keep New York Safe” is a slogan addressing New Yorkers to be vigilant, but also setting the example that every New Yorker comes in all ages, shapes, color, and sizes by providing images 8 x 4 images of different types of New Yorkers. The key to this advertisement is to acknowledge that anybody can essentially look like a New Yorker, but it also places the responsibility on everyone to do their part and be vigilant of any mysterious packages. The repetition of New Yorker is a rhetorical term known as anaphora, which the repetition of the beginning of the phrase.  The effect of repeating “New Yorker” enables the reader, most likely a New Yorker to associate the “If you see something, say something,” with themselves, and the ad places a sense of responsibility for New Yorkers to keep the metropolitan area safe, which addresses New Yorks ethnic diversity.

The “If you see something, say something,” campaign originally began in New York City, but since has expanded to other metropolitan cities like Washington D.C.  The expansion of the campaign can be accredited to many reasons, but I believe two main reasons is the rise of domestic terrorism and the effective use of epistrophe in the slogan, ” If you see something, say something” the repetition of “something” is effective because it is clear to the public anything that seems out of place can be viewed with suspicion, which is also enforced by the image which illustrates a black bag sitting unattended.  Also, the slogan is short, striking, and a memorable phrase has been an effective way for addressing terrorism in the NYC tri-state area, which has caught in other respective metropolitan areas for the risk of a potential attack.

 

Until the End

The image above is a photo of former prime minister, Winston Churchill, in the background. While,  in the foreground an excerpt from his “We Shall Fight on the Beaches” speech is superimposed on the photo. In the excerpt shown above, Churchill uses the rhetorical device anaphora, We Shall. The repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of each line  has the effect of engaging the  audience in a particular emotional experience, and in this case the use of anaphora was to empower Brits to have national pride. In this case, Churchill strategically uses anaphora to strengthen his audience. The speech was in response to lost battles against the Vichy French, which led many to question if England would be taken over by the Nazi’s as well, but to suppress those thoughts he restates the phrase, “We shall fight”, ensuring his audience which was the house of commons and the public as a whole that England will stand there ground to the end.

See Something Say Something”

The image above is a post 9/11 campaign in New York City, “If you see something, say something,” was a response to the 2001 World Trade Center attack. The poster above can be found in New York city’s areas of public transportation, like train stations, bus stops, and  airports. The legitimacy of the campaign is done through the incorporation of official government  agencies and departments logos, including New York City Department and Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The advertisement suggests the appropriate steps for an individual to take if ever encountered with a suspicious unattended package. The “If you see something, say something,” campaign originally began in New York City, but since has expanded to other metropolitan cities like Washington D.C.  The expansion of the campaign can be accredited to many reasons, but I believe two main reasons is the rise of domestic terrorism and the effective use of epistrophe in the slogan, ” If you see something, say something” the repetition of “something” is effective because it is clear to the public anything that seems out of place can be viewed with suspicion, which is also enforced by the image which illustrates a black bag sitting unattened.  Also, the slogan is short, striking, and a memorable phrase has been an effective way for addressing terrorism in the NYC tri-state area, which has caught in other respective metropolitan areas for the risk of a potential attack.  

 

HDP- Class 11

 

Part I

The image is calling for an individual using the restroom to be aware this particular restroom is available for everyone regardless of their gender identity.  The sign is thanking everyone for making it an inclusive environment, and then goes into instructions on how an individual can enhance a sense of safety and security. The image is sponsored by American University’s Housing & Dining Programs demonstrating the university’s stance is in favor of providing all inclusive bathrooms to those who’s gender identity may not align with their physical gender.

Part II

The root of the sentence is: Bathroom available for everyone.  A few key terms that stand out are: inclusive, different, lock, and gender identity.  In response to North Carolina legalizing students in state schools to use the bathroom corresponding  with the gender recorded on their birth certificates, and Georgia protecting “religious liberty” by allowing faith-based groups to deny services to LGBT individuals. After North Carolina’s law, gender identity because a hot button topic, and many states and institutions responded with establishing all inclusive restrooms, like the one you see above.

Samuel Beckett: Failure; Commonplace 7

 

Nobel prize laureate in literature, Samuel Beckett, mentions failure as an inevitable component in improving in his work “Worstward Ho!”. In it Beckett writes,“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”; the significance of this paragraph is because Beckett conveys an unusual message is often not accredited to failure. The paragraph promote tenacity, and Beckett does not allow failure to derail an individual from pursuing or trying again. On the contrary, Beckett encourages an individual to keep on pursuing by placing a positive connotation to failure, by humanizing it. For instance, his use of anaphora, “Ever tried. Ever failed.”, places emphasis on both “tried” and “failed”, later used as an anaphora in the last three sentences. Use of the period in this entire paragraph is being used as a tool in emphasizing a statement, as if there is no room for questioning. Perhaps, the simple structure must with the topic of the paragraph that failure is as simple and normal as his simple sentence structure. However, I do believe Beckett strategically chose to use simple sentence structure over commas, exclamation point, question marks, or other forms of punctuation as a strategic move on his behalf. For instance, if he placed two question marks for the first two sentences and exclamation points for each sentence would drastically transform the paragraphs’ relationship to “Ever tried? Ever failed? No matter! Try again! Fail again! Fail better! “. The transformed sentence is no longer emphasizing the first two sentences as  statement, but  now changes the relationship of simple structure to a rhetorical one, and it is followed by commands that are expressed through exclamation points.  Both simple and rhetorical/ exclaiming structures assume the author’s audience has tried and failed, but the transformed version demands and pressures his audience, unlike the simple structure which simply states the entire phrase as a truth.

If the formatting was in DC, IC form the relationship and meaning of the sentence would look a bit like, “Ever tried, ever failed, but no matter try again, fail again, and fail better.” Frankly Beckett’s original version offers a sense of emphasis where it is needed, and it perhaps more effective in conveying his message of normalizing failure because it does not question or demand anything of his audience. His message has lived on since his publishing “Worstward Ho!”  in 1983, and has transcended into different electronic social media platforms creating the hashtag, #Failbetter, which I would be inclined to argue would have not caught on if Beckett placed exclamation points at the end of his two sentences, because individuals attempting to improve a lifestyle don’t want to feel like they are being told to do so. The father of successful failures and failing better was strategic in being conscious of his audience, and understood improving or modifying a particular behavior is to be empathetic rather than be demanding. The phrase has had such an impact that there was a FAIL BIG event on March 28th, where fail tales were drawn from artists, musicians, and scientists social media platforms. Some food for thought: if Beckett would have not used simple structure, would the lives it has impacted thus far be Vietcong failure with a positive connotation.

 

How To Save Paper?

The image above illustrates an elementary’s school poster board on “How To Save Paper.” Ironically the school demonstrates “How To Save Paper” by using paper a 10′ x 8′ sheet of paper for each letter in the title, which totals to 14 pieces of paper. Below the title, there are descriptions essentially describing how to save paper by recycling. For instance, one states ” A way to save paper is to reduce, reuse, recycle .” The list at the end of the sentence effectively applies alliteration to emphasize on “How to save paper,” and the omission of a conjunction between  reuse and recycle allows the phrase to easily flow, allowing individuals to easily remember on how to save paper.

To place recycling paper into context it began in the late 17th century when the Rittenhouse Mill in Philadelphia opened and began recycling linen and cotton rags. The paper produced from these materials was sold to printers for use in Bibles and newspapers.

 

“Land of the Free” ain’t nothing gotta do with it

“The Land of the Free is for the freeloaders Leave us dead in the streets to be their organ donors

They disorganized my people made us all loners Still got the last names, of our slave owners” (Bada$$)

 

Jo-Vaughn Virginie Scott, better known by his stage name Joey Bada$$, is an American hip-hop recording artist and actor, who recorded  the political track, “Land of the Free”, which mentions mass incarceration and describes the American history for Afro-Americans.The song was introduced on January 16th for Martin Luther King day, and ‘’Land of the Free’‘ was released on January 20th 2017—both Joey’s birthday and the day of Donald Trump’s inauguration—and is a single for Joey’s upcoming album AABA.

 

The “Land of the Free” is a reference to the American national anthem, Star Spangle Banner, created by Francis Scott Key in times of our nations independence. He criticize’s the way Afro-American’s are seen today as freeloaders to be left as organ donors, which is critiquing the way mainstream America views people of color. In his second line he criticizes the white men who enslaved his ancestors and did not allow them to unionize, and left them with their last names as a reminder of how they once were owned. Through the use of alliteration, repetition of initial consonant sounds in words, Joey empathizes his message of Afro-American’s being disregarded in American history. The term “Land of the free” has a positive connotation, but Joey Bada$$ uses the term in a negative connotation.  The purpose of these rhetorical devices effectively convey a message of distaste for the current political climate under the Trump administration. 

 

Image result for Make Amerikkka Suck Again

The artwork shows Joey in a ‘’Make Amerikkka Suck Again’‘ shirt with what seems to be an illustration of a Nazi eagle symbol, (Reichsadler). This can be interpreted as a criticism of Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign slogan ‘’Make America Great Again’’. Trump has been accused of ‘’dog whistling’’ to the Alt-Right movement and other demographics who believe in white nationalism.

 

Thinking Outside the Box

 

“Commonplace books encourage students to read and analyze texts as skillfully crafted documents that convey and perform different kinds of meanings—among them, aesthetic, rhetorical, and political” (724).

In the song “Love Yourz” by the rapper J. Cole  he addresses the youth of America who struggles with valuing the beauty of their lives through an individuals friendships, family, and human interactions. Millennials or better known as the anxious generation struggles to differentiate the gratification materialism and genuine happiness. In this song J. Cole unpacks his own personal experience and talks to the common man about valuing themselves. Focusing on the following lyrics will allow us to further understand his message:

“Don’t be sleepin’ on you lover cause its beauty in the struggle nigga
Goes for all y’all

It’s beauty in the struggle nigga
It’s beauty in the struggle nigga, ugliness in the success
Hear my words or listen to my signal of distress
I grew up in the city and though some times we had less
Compared to some of my niggas down the block man we were blessed
And life can’t be no fairytale, no once upon a time
But I be God damned if a nigga don’t be tryin’
So tell me mama please why you be drinking all the time?
Does all the pain he brought you still linger in your mind?
Cause pain still lingers on mine”

J.Cole is a musically artistic lyricist especially when it comes to rhyming and using the common day vernacular used among most often millennials or rap enthusiasts. In communicating his message of not comparing an individual’s level of success through material possessions, but through level of happiness.  In his message he demonstrates a sense of urgency especially when referring to the line, “listen to my signal of distress”, and he goes on to invoke common references that pertain to his life and the lives of his targeted audience, for instance  he provides credibility about talking about the subject of poverty and success because he’s lived both, which can be seen on the line”I grew up in the city and though some times we had less
Compared to some of my niggas down the block man we were blessed”. He furthers his school of thought by providing personal anecdotes to prove the “struggle” and “ugliness in success”, which may be alluding to his music career launching off by describing his personal struggles. J. Cole knows his audience intimately and provides credibility through his words and his career, and provides a logical perspective by comparing the live of someone who has it all materialistically but struggles with happiness, and someone who has a strong support system but has less material possessions.

 

Under Obama’s Roof: No Dakota Access Pipeline

How does the sentence structure perhaps affect how we read this? Would the impact be different if it were written in a DC, IC form?  How so? How would it change if he used question marks after the first two sentences? And exclamation points afterward?

“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

 

The video I’ve been waiting for!

Preface: The video I’ve been waiting for! In a previous post, Staying In Touch,  I mentioned my hometown, Jersey City, is preparing for its 2017 mayoral elections.  

Under the administration of mayor Fulop Jersey City for the first time in history has conducted a city address by addressing each of the 6  wards, absolutely genius because a city like Jersey city is rich in diversity and ranges in demographic by ward. According to WalletHub Jersey City is the most diverse city in America, something I appreciate dearly. Being a Jersey city native I never truly appreciated or noted its diversity, I assumed every city in America was a reflection of Jersey city which may be because my family rarely traveled out of the tri-state area– mala mia. However, ever since I left off to college to the nation’s capitol I have come to appreciate my home even more, because I now have something to compare it to.

I was born and raised in the Greenville area, and growing up it’s reputation has never been a positive one. In fact, the area is recognized for crime and drugs, and once I saw the first released addressing the Bergen-Lafayette area I was curious to see what would Greenville’s video look like, because Fulop’s administration in comparison to other wards in my eyes has neglected Ward A. After seeing the video I’ve analyzed the overall vision Jersey city sees itself having, which includes looking forward to economic development, strengthening public safety, and maintaining and potentially expanding youth programs. These video’s are rhetorical genius because they know their audience. Each video and city hall was not a ploy but both a genius communication and political move, because each video like the city address is tailored to the needs of each community.  The video’s audience would consist of local residents, particularly those who are actively in the community engaged, or individual’s looking into moving to Jersey city. The video clearly show’s the “revitalization” process the city is undergoing. The tone of the music in the video is empowering including the positive images, anecdotes of the citizens that have been impacted by change, all these nuances are effective to lure in a young audience who is interested in learning more about Jersey city. The video not only appeals to an individual’s emotions it also appeals to logic especially after the improvement the city has seen. Any native resident watching the video must know  jersey city is seeing brighter days compared to a two decades ago. For me personally it is nearly impossible for my eyes not to swell up watching the video, and even though change has taken place some may argue not enough change has taken place.