Common Place 5

In her article “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment,” Sarah Schindler examines the systemic racism ingrained in the very design of our urban areas.

In “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment,” Sarah Schindler examines the systemic racism ingrained in our urban areas.

In “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment,” Sarah Schindler examines how systemic racism is ingrained in our urban areas.

 

She opens up the paper listing examples of architectural racism in common but essential physical surroundings.

 

Her examples: Robert Moses’ bridges en route to Jones Beach, Atlanta, and Georgia’s subway system (MARTA).

 

Taking a look at Robert Moses, who is known as one of the master builders of New York and the architect of Jones Beach Park, Schindler uncovers the reality of the overpasses designed to be just too short to allow for a regular city bus to pass underneath.

Looking at Robert Moses, one of the builders of New York and architect of Jones Beach Park, Schindler uncovers the reality of overpasses designed too short for a regular city bus to pass underneath.

 

When these bridges are strategically placed along the route to Moses’ acclaimed park the population who utilizes these buses, traditionally the economically downtrodden or racially discriminated against, are barred from easy access to it.

 

A similar occurrence takes place in Atlanta, Georgia, where suburban citizens have vehemently voted down any expansion of their MARTA subway line into the suburbs.

A similar occurrence takes place in Atlanta, Georgia, where suburban citizens have vehemently voted down expansion of the MARTA subway line into the suburbs.

 

With suburbs on the rise as the primary location for both jobs and housing around many cities the unattainability of the outer reaches of the city is magnified by the viciously cognizant decree of the majority.

With suburbs on the rise as the primary location for both jobs and housing around many cities,  the unobtainable outer reaches of the city is magnified by the viciously cognizant decree of the majority.

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