Category / Reading Analysis

  • April 23, 2017 - mh9868a

    RA 6: His or Hers?

    In her article “His & Hers? Designing for a Post-Gender Society,” Suzanne Tick argues that the world needs to adjust to the new post-gender society. In other words, Tick says that the fashion industry is attempting to use clothing design to support the new gender-neutral society. Moreover, she also discusses several other platforms for gender […]

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  • In the final chapter of his book City of Rhetoric, David Fleming argues that it is important for young people to learn civic politics in order to understand what city design teaches its residents. More specifically, Fleming believes it is important to understand the places around us and what they teach us. This is important […]

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  • March 26, 2017 - mh9868a

    RA 4: Place Matters

    In chapter eight of his book City of Rhetoric, David Fleming argues that there is a relationship between place and rhetorical well-being in cities. In other words in chapter eight, entitled, “Toward a New Sociospatial Dialectic,” Fleming outlines how the physical location of a place relates to the overall rhetorical design of a city. More […]

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  • March 21, 2017 - mh9868a

    RA 3: The Apolitical Nature of Suburbs

    In his book City of Rhetoric, David Fleming uses the Chicago suburb of Schaumburg to argue that suburbs are apolitical because they avoid the typical politics of a city or neighborhood. Ultimately this argument is important because it explains the different, more privatized, structure of suburbs compared to the highly political structure of cities. Furthermore, […]

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  • In chapter three of City of Rhetoric, David Fleming uses the idea of democracy to solve the rhetorical problem of the rhetoric of neighborhoods. In other words, he argues that a neighborhood’s residential community association (RCA) exemplifies  large scale political institutions. First Fleming traces the history of neighborhoods as far back as the ancient Greeks to as […]

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  • February 9, 2017 - mh9868a

    RA1: The Racist Designs of American Cities

    In part two of her piece “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment,” Sarah Schindler argues that cities are intentionally designed to segregate a city’s poor and minority populations. Specifically, she argues that city designers put poor communities in undesirable locations to avoid clashes with the upper class. For example, in […]

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  • The introduction of David Fleming’s City of Rhetoric gives examples of why the social construct of city planning must be changed. He uses the example of the very poor, predominantly black community of Cabrini Green in the north side of Chicago. Fleming explains that when black migrated to northern cities to escape southern discrimination, they […]

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  • The book City of Rhetoric by David Fleming argues that public discourse and city planning are directly connected. Fleming claims that the placement of buildings has “social meaning” (Fleming xi). For example, during the urbanization period of the United States, cities’ placement of government housing demonstrated the attitudes of the people living in such housing. […]

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