About Me

Hello, my name is Moriah Mitchell. I grew up in Clarion, PA, but I am currently studying Biology and Mathematical Epidemiology with a minor in Chemistry at American University in Washington, DC. I will graduate with dual Bachelor of Science degrees in May 2019.

Outside of the classroom, I am actively involved in two research projects. My senior honors thesis is a continuation of an independent research project designed to investigate evolutionary genetics and UV-C sensitivity in cave and surface amphipod populations in Dr. David Carlini’s laboratory at American University. Concurrently, I am working to add cell cycle regulation and estrogen receptor signaling to an existing computational model for iron dynamics in breast epithelial cells under the guidance of Dr. Julia Chifman and Dr. Reinhard Laubenbacher. I have also studied epidemiology of infectious disease in residence halls, chemical warfare, and amphibian disease surveillance.

Photo of me on my horse Ellie

At American University, I am employed as a both a Peer Leader for a first-year seminar course centered on the control of chemical weapons and as a biology, chemistry, public health, math, and statistics Tutor for NCAA student athletes. I enjoy helping students reach their academic potential and making learning fun.

I am a competitive equestrian and spend most of my free time at the barn working with my mare, Ellie. I rescued and started training my first horse, Magic, at 11. I have experimented with and competed in a variety of disciplines over the years including hunters, equitation, dressage, reining, competitive trail riding, horsemanship, and western pleasure.

I am looking forward to beginning graduate school in 2019 and continuing to develop as a scientist. I plan to pursue a Ph.D. in Computational Biology, Molecular Biology, Genetic Epidemiology, or Biomathematics. I am interested in research with public health applications and hope to some day apply my quantitative skills to developing computational models for disease systems using my own data.