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Simplicity and the Art of Failing

Samuel Beckett, Writer

When Samuel Beckett writes, “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail Better” in Worstward Ho! Beckett is saying that in order to achieve progress, we must fail. Looking at this superficially, one may feel as though that this is counterproductive to what it means to progress but in fact it is not because every time we fail we learn something and learning is always in the direction of progress. What Beckett has to say about failure matters because society has put this stigma on the concept of failure as being “bad” or something that is not suppose to happen or that failure should be avoided and this in actuality isn’t the case, we should all try and fail and try again and fail.

Samuel Beckett would use such simple structures in his works, to deliver his point in a focused manner. He’re trying to prove a single point, why is it necessary to add things to the sentences that are just going to take away from this point or cloud his position? The saying is true that sometimes less is more and this structure absolutely affects how we read this. If Samuel Beckett were to use question marks after the first two sentences I think that it would certainly grab the reader’s attention but it would also leave the reader to answer the questions in their head about if they’ve ever tried and if they’ve ever failed. Answering of these questions in one’s own head is leading the reader to be caught up in his or her own thoughts of these memories rather that focusing and continue reading Beckett’s point which is what having a period mark forces one to do; same thing with an exclamation point it almost doesn’t leave any room for the reader to mentally “wander off” in his or her own thoughts. For these reasons, I think the simple structure that Samuel Beckett uses to deliver his point is highly effective.

Analysis of Schindler’s Architectural Exclusion Theory Pt. II

In Part II of  “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Designs of the Built Environment,” Sarah Schindler outlines the various ways states and communities actively practice architectural exclusion which further perpetuate racism and classism. The methods of architectural exclusion are addressed were physical barriers, transit laws, placement of highways and one way streets, An example of a physical barrier that was used to keep a race of people out of certain area was the Long Island bridge that purposefully was constructed to hang low so that the tall public transportation buses couldn’t under them. The public transportation buses were typically used by the african american people and low income people in that area. Robert Moses, the architect responsible for the bridge actively made sure the bridge’s over pass wasn’t tall enough for buses to get through, the same way he made sure not to extend the railroad’s because all these pathways lead to Jones Beach an area he wanted to keep for only white upper middle class people and keep black people out of entirely. Moses as an architect willingly made it purposefully difficult for a specific race and class of people to physically enter a certain community.

Communities also engage in Architectural exclusion through the infrastructure of public transportation design and spaces. Many cities such as Washington DC, Atlanta, and San Francisco have middle class white residents voting to keep public transportation stops out of  their communities because of the fact that the majority of people that take public transportation in these cities are African American and/or low income. These communities are purposely voting again certain transit amendments to exclude people from their community based upon race and class.  

The placement of highways and one way streets also are part of architectural exclusion practices, these structures are placed in ways that separate one group of people from another and both of these structures make it more difficult to enter a community. Highways are placed in between affluent communities or towns and the urban areas that are majority low income making it inconvenient and difficult for those to the low income communities to travel and get across to the suburban affluent communities because of multi-lane highway danger. One way streets act in a similar way, where it is very difficult to get in and out of a neighbor due to a long winding road that is also a one way street. This inconvenient and confusing route of entry into neighbors deters people from entering that are not from those neighborhoods. The people that typically live in these neighborhoods are non-people of color that are in the middle class or upper class.

The supporting, defending, and constructing of these architecturally exclusive structures are problematic and detrimental in a number of ways. One way streets, physical structures, highways and transit infrastructure continue to isolate and marginalize people of color and people that are poor and low income. Racially prejudice and discriminatory acts are now just being disguised through these practices rather than being confronted, dealt with, and addressed justly.

 

Queen Bey

I’ve always  been a little puzzled and confused about the world’s insane obsession with Beyoncé. Not to be misunderstood, Im always proud to see any black woman flourishing and just doing the damn thing, but an obsession? Really? There are people that want to be this woman. She can be 2 hours late to her own concert and people will still wait for her then cry, cheer, and  scream for hours at her show. People will spend 4 months worth of rent to even get a seat close to the stage she’s performing on. Some people treat her like a God and wear t-shirts that say “Beyoncé is my Religion”. So of course you can imagine that when she posted this picture on her Instagram account February 1st nearly broke the internet. This picture was posted, announcing that she is pregnant with twins, being a twin myself I think this is pretty cool. The photo got over 10 million likes on Instagram already, which to be honest, is a tiny fraction of her 94.1 million followers in total! The photo is soft  and aesthetically  pleasing. In typical maternity shoots, the partner is also featured in the photo but this is just the “Queen Bey” herself; Its a classic floral background with a contemporary “hippie” like vibe with the mix match bright colors. The vail adds a tone of regality over the entire photo, playing to her nickname “Queen Bey”. Of course a pregnancy is  a big deal and reason for celebration but I’m convinced that this Beyoncé could do just about anything, take a photo and the world would go bonkers. Her star power is out of this world, but like the 94 million other people, I want to wish her a congratulations on her expected blessings!