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Category: Neural Stimulation

Article in Nature on monitoring behavior in rodents

An interesting summary of recent methods for monitoring behavior in rodents was published this week in Nature.The article mentions Lex Kravitz and his lab’s efforts on the Feeding Experimentation Device (FED) and also OpenBehavior. Check it out:  https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02403-5

StimDuino

December 20, 2017

StimDuino, an inexpensive Arduino-controlled stimulus isolator that allows for highly accurate, reproducible automated setting of stimulation currents. The automatic stimulation patterns are software-controlled and the parameters are set from Matlab-coded simple, intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface. StimDuino-generated automation of the input-output relationship assessment eliminates need for the current intensity manually adjusting, improves stimulation reproducibility, accuracy and allows on-site and remote control of the stimulation parameters for both in vivo and in vitro applications.


Sheinin, A., Lavi, A., & Michaelevski, I. (2015). StimDuino: An Arduino-based electrophysiological stimulus isolator. Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 243, 8-17. doi:10.1016/j.jneumeth.2015.01.016

FinchScope

May 19th, 2017 

William Liberti, from the Gardner Lab out of Boston University, has shared the following with Open Behavior regarding ‘FinchScope’. Although originally designed for finches, the 3D printed single-photon fluorescent imaging microscope has since been adapted for rodents and other avian species.


The FinchScope project aims to provide a modular in-vivo optophysiology rig for awake, freely behaving animals, with a transparent acquisition and analysis pipeline. The goal is to produce a customizable and scaleable single-photon fluorescent imaging microscope system that takes advantage of developing open-source analysis platforms. These tools are built from easily procured off-the-shelf components and 3D printed parts.
We provide designs for a 3D printed,  lightweight, wireless-capable microscope and motorized commutator, designed for multi-month monitoring the neural activity (via genetically encoded calcium indicators) of zebra finches while they sing their courtship songs. It has since been adapted for rodents, and to other birds such as canaries.
 

The Github project page can be found here.

FlyPi

April 28, 2017
In addition to sharing his Nose Poke Device, Dr. Andre Chagas from Open Neuroscience has also shared the following with Open Behavior regarding FlyPi:

The FlyPi is an open source and affordable microscope/experimental setup (the basic configuration can be built for ~100 Dollars). A collaboration between Open Neuroscience and Trend in Africa, the device is based on the Raspberry Pi, Arduino microcontroller and off-the-shelf electronic components. So far it has been used for: Light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, optogenetics experiments, behavioural tracking, thermogenetic experiments. It has also been used as a teaching tool in workshops where students use it as an entry point into the world of electronics and programming.

Due to the modular and portable design, new applications could be easily created by the community to solve unforeseen needs/problems.


Open Ephys

March 17, 2017

Jakob Voigts, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has shared the following regarding www.open-ephys.org. Open Ephys aims to distribute reliable open source software as well as tools for extracellular recording and stimulation.


Open Ephys is a collaborative effort to develop, document, and distribute open-source tools for systems neuroscience. Since the spring of 2011, our main focus has been on creating a multichannel data acquisition system optimized for recordings in freely behaving rodents. However, most of our tools are general enough to be used in applications involving other model organisms and electrode types.

We believe that open-source tools can improve basic scientific research in a variety of ways. They are often less expensive than their closed-source counterparts, making it more affordable to scale up one’s experiments. They are readily modifiable, giving scientists a degree of flexibility that is not usually provided by commercial systems. They are more transparent, which leads to a better understanding of how one’s data is being generated. Finally, by encouraging researchers to document and share tools they would otherwise keep to themselves, the open-source community reduces redundant development efforts, thereby increasing overall scientific productivity.” – Jakob Voigts

Open Ephys features devices such as the flexDrive, a “chronic drive implant for extracellular electrophysiology”, as well as an arduino-based tetrode twister. The Pulse Pal generates precise voltage pulses. Also featured on Open Ephys is software such as Symphony, a MATLAB-based data acquisition system for electrophysiology.