There’s no whey I’ll post a punny title.

I lied.

Whey protein has become a staple purchase for the “part-time” body builders, without much research. Presumably, the guys that are working out every muscle in their chest without conceptualizing the effects of their workout, are also the ones consuming whey protein with little consideration for the effects of whey to their body. Whey is a complex protein made up of sub-fraction peptides, of which, some have unbelievable benefits.

Our class understands that proteins are amino acids. Most of us know hat whey is the liquid part of the milk that separates during cheese production. But what is whey protein? A bulking supplement? A substance with more concentrated protein for stronger muscles? A placebo to sell for GMC and BodyBuilder to make more money through the industry of aesthetics?  (Sorry… I mean… fitness.)

The good news about whey-protein has been published on all the workout forums and sites. High BCAA content, an increase in brain serotonin levels, stress reduction, and most recently, even combat HIV. All of the snarky comments aside, BodyBuilder.com has posted the benefits of using Whey Protein instead of eating eggs, and using the cheaper store-brand proteins.

“One of whey’s major effects is its apparent ability to raise glutathione (GSH).  GSH is arguably the most important water-soluble antioxidant found in the body.

The concentration of intracellular GSH is directly related to lymphocytes (an important arm of the immune system) reactivity to a challenge, which suggests intracellular GSH levels are one way to modulate immune function.

GSH is a tri-peptide made up of the amino acids L-cysteine, L-glutamine and glycine. Of the three, cysteine is the main source of the free sulfhydryl group of GSH and is a limiting factor in the synthesis of GSH (though the effects of whey on GSH is more complicated than simply its cysteine content).

Because GSH is known to be essential to immunity (oxidative stress, general well being, and reduced levels of GSH are associated with a long list of diseases) whey has a place in anyone’s nutrition program. Reduced GSH is also associated with overtraining syndrome (OTS) in athletes, so whey may very well have an application in preventing, or at least mitigating, OTS.” http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/willbrink3.htm

There are four types of whey. Concentrates, Isolates, Ion-Exchange, and Micro-Filtered Isolates. Concentrated whey is simply whey with reduced lactose. Reduced lactose means more protein, nearly 80% protein in whey. Simple.

Isolates, contain nearly 90% protein, but are manufactured differently than concentrated whey. “The protein must be processed under low temperature and/or low acid conditions as not to “denature” the protein and this becomes an even greater concern when making high grade isolates vs, concentrates.”

Ion-Exchange is not preferred. Essentially, the whey protein is taken through the stage of concentration, as described earlier, and then run through an ion-exchange once more. Running the whey through this exchange marginalizes the sub-factors of the peptides,  but increases the concentration of protein. Takeaway: If you want to get large, without thinking of the rest of your body’s benefits, buy this!

Lastly, Micro-Filtered Isolates. The most frequent MFI is Cross Flow Micro-Filtration.  CFM is processed through a method that uses a low temperature micro filtration techniques that allows for the production of very high protein contents (>90%), the retention of important subfractions, extremely low fat and lactose contents, with virtually no undenatured proteins. A healthier alternative to an Ion-Exchange Whey Protein. The benefits of whey-protein come from the subfractions of peptides, not the protein in the amino acid.

Whey protein has been manipulated, but an informed consumer will know that there are benefits to whey outside of concentrated protein.

10 thoughts on “There’s no whey I’ll post a punny title.”

  1. This information is very interesting. I myself consume whey on a daily basis, which is very helpful when it comes to supplementing my protein intake. However, I was not aware before reading this about the other health benefits it offers.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *