Touchscreen Cognition and MouseBytes

NOVEMBER 21, 2019 Tim Bussey and Lisa Saksida from Western University and the BrainsCAN group developed touchscreen device chambers that can be used to measure rodent behavior. While the touchscreens themselves are not an open-source device, we appreciate the open-science push for creating a user community, performing workshops and tutorials, and data sharing. Most notably, […]

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Updates on LocoWhisk and ART

OCTOBER 3, 2019 Dr Robyn Grant from Manchester Metropolitan University in Manchester, UK has shared her group’s most recent project called LocoWhisk, which is a hardware and software solution for measuring rodent exploratory, sensory and motor behaviours: In describing the project, Dr Grant writes, “Previous studies from our lab have shown that that analysing whisker […]

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3D Printed Headcap and Microdrive

SEPTEMBER 26, 2019 In their 2015 Journal of Neurophysiology article, the Paré Lab at the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience at Rutgers University describe their novel head-cap and microdrive design for chronic multi-electrode recordings in rats through the use of 3D printing technology and highlight the impact of 3D printing technology on neurophysiology: There […]

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SignalBuddy

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 Richard Warren, a graduate student in the Sawtell lab at Columbia University, recently shared his new open-source project called SignalBuddy: SignalBuddy is an easy-to-make, easy-to-use signal generator for scientific applications. Making friends is hard, but making SignalBuddy is easy. All you need is an Arduino Uno! SignalBuddy replaces more complicated and (much) […]

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Ratcave

AUGUST 29, 2019 Nicholas A. Del Grosso and Anton Sirota at the Bernstein Centre for Computational Neuroscience recently published their new project called Ratcave, a Python 3D graphics library that allows researchers to create and 3D stimuli in their experiments: Neuroscience experiments often require the use of software to present stimuli to a subject and […]

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SpikeGadgets

AUGUST 22, 2019 We’d like to highlight groups and companies that support an open-source framework to their software and/or hardware in behavioral neuroscience. One of these groups is SpikeGadgets, a company co-founded by Mattias Karlsson and Magnus Karlsson. SpikeGadgets is a group of electrophysiologists and engineers who are working to develop neuroscience hardware and software […]

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Pathfinder

AUGUST 8, 2019 Matthew Cooke and colleagues from Jason Snyder’s lab at University of British Columbia recently developed open source software to detect spatial navigation behavior in animals called Pathfinder: Spatial navigation is studied across several different paradigms for different purposes in animals; through analyzing spatial behaviors we can gain insight into how an animal […]

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