Gender Representation

In Suzanne Tick’s article “His & Hers? Designing for a Post-Gender Society”, she argues that designers should focus a critical eye on society’s issues, particularly by promoting acceptance and change through their work. In her opinion, this is the opportune time for designers to start questioning how they incorporate gender sensitivity into their projects. Historically, society is […]

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Home 1230 North Burling Street

  Reading Analysis 3: Home 1230 North Burling Street         In Chapter Seven, “Home”, in  City of Rhetoric author David Fleming synthesizes his two previous chapters which discuss blacks’ political participation as subordinate to whites. In history, political initiatives or movements have occurred through political coalitions and for groups of homogeneous intellect or phenotypes to unite […]

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Gender

reading analysis #6: You used to be given a choice. Male or Female. Now, those two words that used to separate people, actually bring us together. Suzanne Tick, author of article His & Hers? Designing for a Post-Gender Society, explains how our corporate world is not only changing, but evolving for our new “post-gender society”. A […]

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RA 6- Post Gender Society

In her article “His & Hers? Designing for a Post-Gender Society,” Suzanne Tick discusses the need for society to familiarize themselves with a new post-gender society. In her article, she addresses the sectors of society that are supporting gender-neutral roles in different ways (e.g. Google creating all-inclusive bathrooms). In fact, Suzanne argues the post gender […]

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The Final Words

Reading Analysis 5: In the last chapter of the book City of Rhetoric, author David Fleming wraps up his final words  by explaining what his overall point of this book is; to consider and better understand our metropolitan lives together as well as our civic responsibilities. He mentions1990’s urban poverty and how it was lower because […]

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Afterword

In Chapter 10 “Afterword”, David Fleming concludes his book by hoping that in the future the forces that keep us apart and repress our public life will be overcome. More specifically, he places the future of our public life on the youth. For example, Fleming theorizes that if the youth is taught not only the benefits […]

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