Doing Better at Doing Good

Course type: Community Based Learning. As a part of this course, students will actively serve with a nonprofit agency or school in the DC area to apply their course knowledge. This course examines the conversation on poverty in Washington, DC through scholarship, research, and community-based service-learning with an afterschool program. Horton’s Kids is a local […]

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Wildlife Conservation

The World Wildlife Fund recently reported that total wildlife populations declined over 50% between 1970 and 2010.  Our class will explore the primary causes of habitat and wildlife loss including consumption, pollution, and climate change. We will then engage with diverse political, economic, and social approaches to preserving and protecting the remaining biodiversity. Our class […]

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Navigating Intimacy

The complexity of forming intimate relationships is an enduring topic of research, fascination and questioning throughout time. This course offers the unique opportunity for an intensive exploration of how the current state of navigating intimacy in emerging adults was shaped through the lens of modern history. “Navigating Intimacy” exposes students to an exciting and timely […]

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Locating the International

This two-part course begins by exploring how we understand ‘the international’. Usually, we tend to think of the international as being defined by the line between the domestic and the foreign. However, this line is often moving, blurrier than we think, and even appears in new places. By engaging students with a range of material […]

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Future of Technology Policy

From the politics of social media and autonomous vehicles to asteroid mining, gene-editing, environmental issues, and innovations and implications we can’t yet imagine – the future of technology policy is as interesting and important as ever. As consumers, entrepreneurs, citizens, and policy-makers, what do we need to be thinking about and what kinds of skills […]

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Judging Atrocity

Our practices of holding one another responsible for wrongdoing depend on the attribution of moral agency, and the view that, as human beings, we are not simply causes in the world, but authors of our actions. Contemporary psychological research increasingly reveals, however, that human action is largely influenced by situational factors beyond our control. How, […]

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