A Look Towards the Future: Fleming’s Commonplace

Rhetorical Analysis #5 By Kwesi Billups In Chapter 8 of his City of Rhetoric, David Fleming defines the terms by which he believes the reductive societal pictures of suburbia, home, and ghetto can be discarded and replaced by doctrines that seek to erase discrimination, violence, and isolation from the subtext of housing planning and, thus,  public […]

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Sociospatial Dialect: The Future of Discourse

Reading Analysis #4 By Kwesi Billups In Chapter 3 of his City of Rhetoric, David Fleming makes use of theories of proxemics, linguistics, and chronemics to present a framework by which a revitalization of public discourse can come forth. Fleming’s proposal of the urban sphere as the tool by which groups can better communicate and restructure the public […]

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The Final Words

Reading Analysis 5: In the last chapter of the book City of Rhetoric, author David Fleming wraps up his final words  by explaining what his overall point of this book is; to consider and better understand our metropolitan lives together as well as our civic responsibilities. He mentions1990’s urban poverty and how it was lower because […]

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Afterword

In Chapter 10 “Afterword”, David Fleming concludes his book by hoping that in the future the forces that keep us apart and repress our public life will be overcome. More specifically, he places the future of our public life on the youth. For example, Fleming theorizes that if the youth is taught not only the benefits […]

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Sociospatial Environment

Rhetorical Analysis #4: Fleming Chapter 8 Throughout the book, author David Fleming constantly argues that our built environment, along with civic public discourse and education, continually shape who we are. In this specific chapter, the first of section 3, Fleming examines the scenes he has talked about in previous chapters such as the ghettos, white […]

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