Ethics, Morals, and Criminal Law

Inherent within criminal law and justice is the power to make discretionary decisions that greatly impact the accused, victims, and society.  This course exposes students to historical and contemporary issues that generate interaction between ethics and criminal justice.  It will examine macro and micro attempts in recent history to ethically balance public safety and “moral” […]

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Judging Atrocity

Our practices of holding one another responsible for wrongdoing depend on the attribution of moral agency, and the view that, as human beings, we are not simply causes in the world, but authors of our actions. Contemporary psychological research increasingly reveals, however, that human action is largely influenced by situational factors beyond our control. How, […]

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Asia’s Conflict “Flashpoints”

Why do interstate conflicts occur? What causes them to become intractable or to escalate in intensity such that they threaten regional or international security? To what extent could, or should the U.S. play a role in helping to defuse or resolve them? This course addresses these questions through an examination of three “flashpoints” of conflict […]

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