Posts in Category: commonplace

Commonplace Book Entry 10

Pablo Picasso; The Tragedy 1903.

Pablo Picasso; The Tragedy 1903.

On November 21st, I visited the National Gallery of art. Out of all the paintings, sculptures and photographs, Picasso’s “The Tragedy” was one of the pieces that stood out to me the most. The colors and subject express the title successfully. Shades of blue and grey give the artwork a gloomy aura. The content gives the work mystery. What is the woman holding in her arms? Could the tragedy possibly be infant mortality? Additionally, it makes you think about why the artist was doing this. What was he going through at the time? Nowadays, through the internet, this information could be found.

Being able to stand so close to the artwork of one of the most world renown artists, Pablo Picasso, is a treasure in itself. As an artist myself who has studied artists like Picasso and Van Gogh, getting a first person experience was exhilarating. There is a complete different conversation between the viewer and the painting when studying it in person versus over the internet. Being able to see the brush strokes on the painting up close reveals many things. It could possibly show an area where the artist struggled and had to repaint, creating layering and smudging.

Commonplace Book Entry 9

Letts Hall second floor bathroom.

Letts Hall second floor bathroom.

Letts Hall second floor at American University classifies as an all female floor. This means that every bathroom on this floor is accessible to girls. However, due to its original structure, half the bathrooms have “Men Restroom” signs. When we first moved in, were told that the men’s restrooms would now be gender neutral, due to the fact we still have male guests on our floor. Being at a liberal school such as American and having gender neutral bathrooms on the first floor, it could be assumed that everyone would be alright with this decision. However, that wasn’t the case.

A week after move-in day, we were pulled in for a floor meeting. Someone had complained that they weren’t comfortable with the idea of a gender neutral bathroom, and all bathrooms were made exclusively female. This made many of my floormates and myself upset due to the fact that there were still 2 female restrooms in addition to the 2 gender neutral ones. So why couldn’t they just use those exclusively? This also made me think about why administration would make this accommodation for just one person?

Commonplace Book Entry 8

Photo by Andrew Yianne, a fellow American University Student.

Photo by Andrew Yianne, a fellow American University Student.

On November 11th, 2 members of the Westboro baptist church protested in front of American University. They’re known for their hateful protests concerning LGBT people, Catholics, Orthodox Christians, Muslims, Jews, American soldiers and politicians. American being a liberal school, accepting of all and any sexualities and races, they came to protest the LGBT community. It came to be that hundreds of students came out to peacefully protest back. These signs shows above put into perspective that there are and always will be hateful people in the world. Coming from a city like Miami a very diverse city, seeing this was new to me. Experiencing a protest in person for the first time made me put into context what I’ve learned in all my history classes.

Commonplace Book Entry 7

“A group of American University students burned U.S. flags on the D.C. campus Wednesday afternoon to protest Donald Trump’s election as president, some shouting “F— white America!” -The Washington Post

“A group of American University students burned U.S. flags on the D.C. campus Wednesday afternoon to protest Donald Trump’s election as president, some shouting “F— white America!” -The Washington Post

The day after the presidential election, a U.S. flag was burned by one student in front of an academic building. As a part of the student body of American University, this put worry into my thoughts. I too was disappointed at the victory of Donald Trump, however do not believe this was an appropriate way to show it. Our U.S. flag stand for much more than just a piece of fabric that labels us as the United States. Thousands of people risk their lives everyday to keep that flag in the air. I took this act as a sign of disrespect, as I’m sure others did as well.

Not only did the act of burning a flag lead to controversy within our classrooms, it gave American University a national spotlight. However, I wouldn’t say this spotlight is a good thing. It made national headlines on the news, for everyone to see. While some believe protesting in such a way will get their voice heard, playing with fire will get you burned. Do we want to be a University where the burning of our national flag is permitted? If this is permitted, what stops students from starting violent protests? And what if somebody gets hurt? When my parents saw what was happening, they were concerned with my safety. This then became an issue the leaders of our University had to deal with.

Common Place Book Entry 6

[A]n education [. . .] that was designed to support a truly direct, deliberative democracy [. . .] would be an education oriented to the ‘strong publics’ of decision-making rather than the ‘weak publics’ of opinion formation. (205)

In his quote, David Fleming argues that educators should be teaching students to form their own opinions and make thoughtful decisions, as opposed to just regurgitating information. He believes students should be rewarded for actively expressing their opinions and ideas. This is much like some classes I’m currently in. Credit is given for input on the topic and class discussions. This is the type of reward fleming believes will improve student’s use of language effectively and prepare them for real world situations.

students raising hands in classroom

Commonplace Book Entry 5

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“Shall Property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?”

  • The root sentence is: Should student housing be exempt from taxes?
  • 4 words that stick out to be are:
    • Property- referencing the land owned by the University.
    • Exempt- referring to the facilities not paying taxes.
    • Utilized- describing who is using the land.
    • Affordable- explaining why they are exempt from taxes.

The author is posing a question to the reader: “Should University of Georgia student housing be exempt from taxes?”. He does this so the reader can come up with their own interpretation of an answer. The rhetoric of the situation is that the owners of universities and colleges within the state of Georgia wish to have their property remain tax exempt to prevent rising costs for students. The intended audience are the residents of Georgia, specifically the students of the university. 

Commonplace Book Entry 4

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This sign states that the restroom contains two stalls, and is gender neutral, meaning anyone of any gender may use this restroom at any time. These bathrooms are put in place for several reasons. For example, transgender people may experience emotional and physical harassment, deep discomfort, risk of arrest for being in the “wrong” bathroom. Gender neutral bathrooms welcome any gender identities and encourage gender expression. Being that AU is a very accepting and liberal campus, we have many gender neutral bathrooms on campus. AU councils have made the decision to put this sign up on this bathroom. They are focused on having all students thrive in a nondiscriminatory environment.  

Commonplace Book Entry 3

“Her commitment to anti-capitalism, psychogeography, and participation in the dérive builds upon situationist ideas and provides a framework for further exploration of the urban environment.” (Nersessova, 27)

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x,y, z

commitment builds for exploration.

His drive to get an education, make a living, and lose weight builds up his motivation and provides for an increase in motivation.

 

Commonplace Book: Entry 2: The conversation

Intro to Sarah B. Schindler’s Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation through Physical Design of the Built Environment

Robert Moses was known as the “Master Builder” of New York.1 During the time that he was appointed to a number of important state and local offices,2 he shaped much of New York’s infrastructure, including a number of “low-hanging overpasses” on the Long Island parkways that led to Jones Beach.3 According to his biographer, Moses directed that these overpasses be built intentionally low so that buses could not pass under them.4 This design decision meant that many people of color and poor people, who most often relied on public transportation, lacked access to the lauded public park at Jones Beach.5

This follows the template of “They Say, I Say” :

A number of sociologists have recently suggested that X’s work has several fundamental problems.

Excerpt from Sarah B. Schindler’s Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation through Physical Design of the Built Environment

Justice Marshall dissented, acknowledging that this inconvenience carried a “powerful symbolic message.”12 He wrote, “The picture that emerges from a more careful review of the record is one of a white community, disgruntled over sharing its street with Negroes, taking legal measures to keep out the ‘undesirable traffic,’ and of a city, heed-less of the harm to its Negro citizens, acquiescing in the plan.”13 He believed that through this action, the city was sending a clear message to its black residents.

Follows the template of “They Say, I Say” :

Introducing something Implied or Assumed

Commonplace Entry 1

  • Although the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area is known for its car-centric, sprawling development patterns, it has a subway system: the Metro-politan Atlanta Regional Transit Authority (MARTA).

Emphasis is created through the use of a colon on the name of the subway system, MARTA.

  • The architected urban landscape regulates, and the architecture itself is a form of regulation.

The architected urban landscape regulates. The architecture itself is a form of regulation.

a comma and fanboy is used to make the sentence smooth and appealing to the reader.

  • This fence, which was constructed by the local housing authority with funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), blocked access to and through Rosedale, a contiguous, mostly white neighborhood.

This fence, which was constructed by the local housing authority with funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). It blocked access to and through Rosedale, a contiguous, mostly white neighborhood.

When splitting the sentence into two sentences, it gives a subtle pause.

  • laws restricting the use of eminent domain; however, many of those new laws retained exceptions allowing its use to clear blight.

semicolon is used to long the 2 IC’s.

subordinate conjunction “however” is used to continue the idea