Commonplace Book Entry 10

On November 21st, I visited the National Gallery of art. Out of all the paintings, sculptures and photographs, Picasso’s “The Tragedy” was one of the pieces that stood out to me the most. The colors and subject express the title successfully. Shades of blue and grey give the artwork a gloomy aura. The content gives the work mystery. What is the woman holding in her arms? Could the tragedy possibly be infant mortality? Additionally, it makes you think about why the artist was doing this. What was he going through at the time? Nowadays, through the internet, this information could be found.

Pablo Picasso; The Tragedy 1903.

Pablo Picasso; The Tragedy 1903.

Being able to stand so close to the artwork of one of the most world renown artists, Pablo Picasso, is a treasure in itself. As an artist myself who has studied artists like Picasso and Van Gogh, getting a first person experience was exhilarating. There is a complete different conversation between the viewer and the painting when studying it in person versus over the internet. Being able to see the brush strokes on the painting up close reveals many things. It could possibly show an area where the artist struggled and had to repaint, creating layering and smudging.