Posts Tagged: commonplacebook

Commonplace Book Entry 5

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“Shall Property owned by the University System of Georgia and utilized by providers of college and university student housing and other facilities continue to be exempt from taxation to keep costs affordable?”

  • The root sentence is: Should student housing be exempt from taxes?
  • 4 words that stick out to be are:
    • Property- referencing the land owned by the University.
    • Exempt- referring to the facilities not paying taxes.
    • Utilized- describing who is using the land.
    • Affordable- explaining why they are exempt from taxes.

The author is posing a question to the reader: “Should University of Georgia student housing be exempt from taxes?”. He does this so the reader can come up with their own interpretation of an answer. The rhetoric of the situation is that the owners of universities and colleges within the state of Georgia wish to have their property remain tax exempt to prevent rising costs for students. The intended audience are the residents of Georgia, specifically the students of the university. 

Commonplace Book Entry 4

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This sign states that the restroom contains two stalls, and is gender neutral, meaning anyone of any gender may use this restroom at any time. These bathrooms are put in place for several reasons. For example, transgender people may experience emotional and physical harassment, deep discomfort, risk of arrest for being in the “wrong” bathroom. Gender neutral bathrooms welcome any gender identities and encourage gender expression. Being that AU is a very accepting and liberal campus, we have many gender neutral bathrooms on campus. AU councils have made the decision to put this sign up on this bathroom. They are focused on having all students thrive in a nondiscriminatory environment.  

Commonplace Book Entry 3

“Her commitment to anti-capitalism, psychogeography, and participation in the dérive builds upon situationist ideas and provides a framework for further exploration of the urban environment.” (Nersessova, 27)

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x,y, z

commitment builds for exploration.

His drive to get an education, make a living, and lose weight builds up his motivation and provides for an increase in motivation.

 

Commonplace Book: Entry 2: The conversation

Intro to Sarah B. Schindler’s Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation through Physical Design of the Built Environment

Robert Moses was known as the “Master Builder” of New York.1 During the time that he was appointed to a number of important state and local offices,2 he shaped much of New York’s infrastructure, including a number of “low-hanging overpasses” on the Long Island parkways that led to Jones Beach.3 According to his biographer, Moses directed that these overpasses be built intentionally low so that buses could not pass under them.4 This design decision meant that many people of color and poor people, who most often relied on public transportation, lacked access to the lauded public park at Jones Beach.5

This follows the template of “They Say, I Say” :

A number of sociologists have recently suggested that X’s work has several fundamental problems.

Excerpt from Sarah B. Schindler’s Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation through Physical Design of the Built Environment

Justice Marshall dissented, acknowledging that this inconvenience carried a “powerful symbolic message.”12 He wrote, “The picture that emerges from a more careful review of the record is one of a white community, disgruntled over sharing its street with Negroes, taking legal measures to keep out the ‘undesirable traffic,’ and of a city, heed-less of the harm to its Negro citizens, acquiescing in the plan.”13 He believed that through this action, the city was sending a clear message to its black residents.

Follows the template of “They Say, I Say” :

Introducing something Implied or Assumed

Commonplace Entry 1

  • Although the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area is known for its car-centric, sprawling development patterns, it has a subway system: the Metro-politan Atlanta Regional Transit Authority (MARTA).

Emphasis is created through the use of a colon on the name of the subway system, MARTA.

  • The architected urban landscape regulates, and the architecture itself is a form of regulation.

The architected urban landscape regulates. The architecture itself is a form of regulation.

a comma and fanboy is used to make the sentence smooth and appealing to the reader.

  • This fence, which was constructed by the local housing authority with funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), blocked access to and through Rosedale, a contiguous, mostly white neighborhood.

This fence, which was constructed by the local housing authority with funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). It blocked access to and through Rosedale, a contiguous, mostly white neighborhood.

When splitting the sentence into two sentences, it gives a subtle pause.

  • laws restricting the use of eminent domain; however, many of those new laws retained exceptions allowing its use to clear blight.

semicolon is used to long the 2 IC’s.

subordinate conjunction “however” is used to continue the idea