Tag: methods

eNeuro’s “Open Source Tools and Methods” paper topic

SEPTEMBER 12, 2019

There’s a new place to publish your open-source tools or methods in neuroscience! Christophe Bernard, Editor-in-Chief at the journal eNeuro (an open-access journal of the Society for Neuroscience), recently wrote an editorial detailing the opening of a new topic tract in eNeuro for Open Source Tools and Methods. In his editorial, Bernard details how there has been a recent push for open-source science, and highlights how there are many new open-source projects being developed in neuroscience that need a proper home for publication. While eNeuro has a “Methods/New Tools” submission type already, Bernard says the “Open Source Tools and Methods” submission is available for projects like “low-cost devices to measure animal behavior, a new biophysical model of a single neuron, a better method to realign images when performing in vivo two-photon imaging, scripts and codes to analyze signals” and more.

There is no current publication venue explicitly intended for open-source tools and methods in neuroscience, and through the addition of this article type, new tools/methods/devices/projects can be published in a straightforward manner. By including this publication type, it will aid the neuroscience field in replication, reproducibility, and transparency of methods and tools used. A major point from Bernard is that this may help the developers of the tool or method, since “it allows for acknowledgment of those who developed such tools and methods fully, often rotating students or engineers recruited on a short-duration contract. On a standard research paper, their name ends up in the middle of the list of authors, but the Open Source Tools and Methods type will allow them to be the first author.”

The details for submission of an open source tool or method on the eNeuro site is as follows: “Open Source Tools and Methods are brief reports (limited to 4500 words) describing the creation and use of open-source tools in neuroscience research. Examples of tools include hardware designs used in behavioral or physiological studies and software used for data acquisition and analysis. They must contain a critique of the importance of the tool, how it compares to existing open- and closed-source solutions, and a demonstration of tool use in a neuroscience experiment.”

 

Cheers to you, eNeuro, for your inclusion of open-source projects to help advance the neuroscience field!


Link to the editorial: https://www.eneuro.org/content/6/5/ENEURO.0342-19.2019

Current articles for Open Source Tools and Methods are listed here.

To submit an article under Open Source Tools and Methods, check out the instructions for authors at eNeuro here.

3D Printed Headstage Implant

June 6, 2019

Richard Pinnell from Ulrich Hofmann’s lab has three publications centered around open-source and 3D printed methods for headstage implant protection and portable / waterproof DBS and EEG to pair with water maze activity. We share details on the three studies below:


Most researchers opt to single-house rodents after rodents have undergone surgery. This helps the wound heal and prevent any issues with damage to the implant. However, there is substantial benefits to socially-housing rodents, as social isolation can create stressors for them. As a way to continue to socially-house rats, Pinnell et al. (2016a) created a novel 3D-printed headstage socket to surround an electrode connector. Rats were able to successfully be pair housed with these implants and their protective caps.

The polyamide headcap socket itself is 3D printed, and a stainless steel thimble can be screwed into it. The thimble can be removed by being unscrewed to reveal the electrode connector. This implant allows both for increased well-being of the rodent post-surgery, but also has additional benefits in that it can prevent any damage to the electrode implant during experiments and keeps the electrode implant clean as well.

The 3D printed headcap was used in a second study (Pinnell et al., 2016b) for wireless EEG recording in rats during a water maze task. The headstage socket housed the PCB electrode connector and the waterproof wireless system was attached. In this setup, during normal housing conditions, this waterproof attachment was replaced with a standard 18×9 mm stainless-steel sewing thimble, which contained 1.2 mm holes drilled at either end for attachment to the headstage socket. A PCB connector was manufactured to fit inside the socket, and contains an 18-pin zif connector, two DIP connectors, and an 18-pin Omnetics electrode connector for providing an interface between the implanted electrodes and the wireless recording system.

Finally, the implant was utilized in a third study (Pinnell et al., 2018) where the same group created a miniaturized, programmable deep-brain stimulator for use in a water maze. A portable deep brain stimulation (DBS) device was created through using a PCB design, and this was paired with the 3D printed device. The 3D printed headcap was modified from its use in Pinnell et al., 2016a to completely cover the implant and protect the PCB. The device, its battery, and housing weighs 2.7 g, and offers protection from both the environment and from other rats, and can be used in DBS studies during behavior in a water maze.

The portable stimulator, 3D printed cap .stl files, and more files from the publications can be found on https://figshare.com/s/31122e0263c47fa5dabd.


Pinnell, R. C., Almajidy, R. K., & Hofmann, U. G. (2016a). Versatile 3D-printed headstage implant for group housing of rodents. Journal of neuroscience methods, 257, 134-138.

Pinnell, R. C., Almajidy, R. K., Kirch, R. D., Cassel, J. C., & Hofmann, U. G. (2016b). A wireless EEG recording method for rat use inside the water maze. PloS one, 11(2), e0147730.